Bragg's law


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Bragg's law

[′bragz ‚lȯ]
(solid-state physics)
A statement of the conditions under which a crystal will reflect a beam of x-rays with maximum intensity. Also known as Bragg's equation; Bravais' law.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bragg's Law. In order to better understand the phenomenon that occurs inside a polymer photonic crystal, it is necessary to analyze the path of an incident beam that travels through the crystal planes.
According to Bragg's law, the change of the angle between the incident radiation and photonic crystal leads to notable changes of the reflected wavelength, respectively, of the observed color (Figure 6) 35, 36].
A consequence of Bragg's Law is that small scattering angles are associated with spacings that are longer than typical interatomic spacings.
Using Bragg's Law, the path-length difference of these two incident lights was calculated to be 965.9 nm for the 75[degrees] glancing angle and 939.7 nm for the 110[degrees] glancing angle.
His discovery of the law concerning x-ray diffraction in crystals (Bragg's Law) four years later won him the Nobel Prize for Physics, an award he shared with his father William Henry Bragg.
There's Wogan's Law, which proves that Luxembourg will always get deux points in Eurovision; Bragg's Law, which states that anyone who went to Oxbridge will always mention it within seven-and-a-half minutes of starting an interview; Parkinson's Law, which maintains that all chat show hosts are useless unless they come from Yorkshire.
Constructive wave interference is defined by Bragg's law. Whenever the Bragg condition applies, high intensity is measured by the detector.
where L is the correlation length, b is the length of the Burgers vector b, [sigma] equals |sin[psi]| where [psi] is the angle between the line vector l of the dislocation and the vector g, where g is the diffraction vector at which Bragg's law holds exactly for the reflection considered (length g; for cubic material it holds: g = ([h.sup.2] + [k.sup.2] + [l.sup.2])[.sup.1/2]/[a.sub.0], where [a.sub.0] is the lattice parameter of the specimen).
Consider Bragg's Law, where n[lambda] = 2d sin[theta], [lambda] is the x-ray wavelength, and 2d the crystal lattice spacing in [Angstrom], and [theta] the angle the crystal makes with the sample.