Bragg cell

Bragg cell

[′brag ‚sel]
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These include channelized receivers that convert a wide RE bandwidth to a parallel array of frequency selective channels; a compressive receiver that sweeps a wide RF bandwidth at a very high speed then converts the frequency data to time data; the Bragg Cell that propagates an RE signal as an acoustic wave through a crystal, then, with a parallel array of photodetectors, detects a reflected laser; and the digital receiver that directly digitizes RE signals and processes digital samples to extract parametric data.
The AOS-1000 and 1000X4 use state-of-the-art acousto-optic Bragg cell technology to measure instantaneous RF power spectral density for signal analysis (including electronic intelligence reception), spectroscopic and, test and measurement equipment applications.
A Bragg cell, a device used as early as the 1960s to process radar data in aircraft, is a quartz crystal lined with transducers.
The frequency measuring receiver can be an IFM receiver, a compressive receiver or (if practical) a Bragg cell receiver.
Of particular interest, in Chapter 7, the operation of the Bragg cell modulator, which transduces an RF signal to an acoustic signal by means of a piezo-electric transducer, is explained.
The most common channelizer of this type is a laser, which uses a Bragg cell and photo detector outputs as shown in Figure 3.
For example, an RF spectrum analyzer implemented by using an acousto-optic Bragg cell with an exposed film strip as the output can function as a continuously integrating bank of energy detectors, one filter for each of a number of frequency bands.
A relatively new channeled receiver technology, acousto-optic (AO) receivers, involves signal processing using Bragg cell channelizers.
Over this period, AO receivers, another name for Bragg cell channelizers, have been a promising IF receiver choice.
The Bragg cell is a device which converts an RF signal into an acoustic wave of the same frequency.
The acousto-optic Bragg cell is thus a particularly significant component, both on its own as a Fourier-transform processor and as the vital modulator in acousto-optic correlators and convolvers.
The main advantages of the Bragg cell receiver architecture include its relative simplicity (at least in principle), good performance in wideband operation (typically 2 GHz) and high sensitivity.