Bragg cell

Bragg cell

[′brag ‚sel]
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These include channelized receivers that convert a wide RE bandwidth to a parallel array of frequency selective channels; a compressive receiver that sweeps a wide RF bandwidth at a very high speed then converts the frequency data to time data; the Bragg Cell that propagates an RE signal as an acoustic wave through a crystal, then, with a parallel array of photodetectors, detects a reflected laser; and the digital receiver that directly digitizes RE signals and processes digital samples to extract parametric data.
The AOS-1000 and 1000X4 use state-of-the-art acousto-optic Bragg cell technology to measure instantaneous RF power spectral density for signal analysis (including electronic intelligence reception), spectroscopic and, test and measurement equipment applications.
A Bragg cell, a device used as early as the 1960s to process radar data in aircraft, is a quartz crystal lined with transducers.
Of particular interest, in Chapter 7, the operation of the Bragg cell modulator, which transduces an RF signal to an acoustic signal by means of a piezo-electric transducer, is explained.
Bragg cell receivers can measure the frequency of multiple, simultaneous signals so they are not blocked by a single CW signal.
The most common channelizer of this type is a laser, which uses a Bragg cell and photo detector outputs as shown in Figure 3.
Bragg cell and compressive receivers provide instantaneous coverage of wide frequency ranges and can handle multiple simultaneous signals, but they do not demodulate the signals.
For example, an RF spectrum analyzer implemented by using an acousto-optic Bragg cell with an exposed film strip as the output can function as a continuously integrating bank of energy detectors, one filter for each of a number of frequency bands.
A relatively new channeled receiver technology, acousto-optic (AO) receivers, involves signal processing using Bragg cell channelizers.
Over this period, AO receivers, another name for Bragg cell channelizers, have been a promising IF receiver choice.
Acousto-optic (AO) receivers are based upon signal processing using Bragg cells. The Bragg cell is a device which converts an RF signal into an acoustic wave of the same frequency.
The main advantages of the Bragg cell receiver architecture include its relative simplicity (at least in principle), good performance in wideband operation (typically 2 GHz) and high sensitivity.