Bragg curve

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Bragg curve

[′brag ‚kərv]
(atomic physics)
A curve showing the average number of ions per unit distance along a beam of initially monoenergetic ionizing particles, usually alpha particles, passing through a gas. Also known as Bragg ionization curve.
A curve showing the average specific ionization of an ionizing particle of a particular kind as a function of its kinetic energy, velocity, or residual range.
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The intensity decreases with increasing chi Ps, it must be measure the background (Bg) correction at either side of the Bragg peak, e.
The effect of spread in the sample structure on the Bragg peak shape is also investigated.
The correlation effects in the conditions of x-ray diffraction on a harmonic superlattice lead to the formation of diffusion maxima both in the vicinity of the main Bragg peak and around the diffraction satellites [8, 9].
The physics of charged particles is such that there is always a lower entrance dose and, after a bragg peak at a depth specific to the particle, there is no exit dose.
It means that the source of the wave is close to the end of the ion range or the Bragg peak for any material.
Unlike the case with photon and gamma-ray therapy, most of the energy delivered during charged-particle radiotherapy is absorbed at the end of the particles' path through tissue (the Bragg peak phenomenon).
This blast of damaging energy, called a Bragg peak, is dissipated within a 3 mm length, while tumors are usually several centimeters in size.
The Bragg peak refers to the point in the path of the beam (distal end) where protons give up most of their energy.
It eventually reaches a maximum called the Bragg peak close to the end of its trajectory.
3 is defined relative dosimetry system, while Task 4 specifies the chamber to measure the Bragg peak proton beam.
It can be seen that the resultant interference pattern consists of wide humps and fine oscillations around the main Bragg peak.