Brahmagupta


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Brahmagupta

(brä'məgo͝op`tə), c.598–c.660, Indian mathematician and astronomer. He was among the first to meaningfully discuss the concepts of zero and of negative numbers. He wrote in verse the Brahma-sphuta-siddhanta [improved system of Brahma], a standard work on astronomy containing two chapters on mathematics that were translated into English by H. T. Colebrooke in Algebra … from the Sanskrit of Brahmagupta (1817). A shorter treatise, The Khandakhadyaka (tr. 1934), expounded the astronomical system of AryabhataAryabhata
, c.476–550, Hindu mathematician and astronomer. He is one of the first known to have used algebra; his writings include rules of arithmetic and of plane and spherical trigonometry, and solutions of quadratic equations.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Brahmagupta

 

Born circa 598; died 660. Indian mathematician and astronomer.

Brahmagupta’s work Revision of the System of Brahma (628), a significant part of which is devoted to arithmetic and algebra, has come down to us. His studies of arithmetic progression (the well-known law of its summation) and the solution of quadratic equations that have a real solution are expounded in it.

REFERENCE

Iushkevich, A. P. Istoriia matematiki v srednie veka. Moscow, 1961.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Devnani deserves a Bharat Ratna for discovering that the law of gravity was, in fact, discovered by Indian scientist Brahmagupta II one thousand years before Issac Newton.
"In Mathematics, we have the glorious tradition of Baudhaya, Bhaskara, Brahmagupta and Aryabhatta.
Brahmagupta, in 628 A.D., contains a definition of zero as a - a = o.
Among the topics are rotating decimals, 25-point affine geometry, the algebra of electrical circuitry, random walks in trees, and Brahmagupta's cyclic quadrilaterals.
Zero first started being used as an actual number around 458 AD in India by Hindu astronomer and mathematician Brahmagupta. He devised the methods by which zero is reached in calculations, for example 6 - 6 = 0, and also how zero is used in equations.
A Hindu mathematician, Brahmagupta (b.598) generated means of predicting Pythagorean Triples through the study of quadrilaterals.
The topics include the Sulvasutras, mathematics of Jains, Brahmagupta, Bhaskara II, Kerala astronomers, and commentators in the 16th and 17th centuries on Bhaskara II.
Similarly, Brahmagupta developed formulas for determining products of sums of squares and areas of cyclic quadrilaterals.