Brahms

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Brahms

Johannes . 1833--97, German composer, whose music, though classical in form, exhibits a strong lyrical romanticism. His works include four symphonies, four concertos, chamber music, and A German Requiem (1868)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
My informal survey of recordings of Brahms by highly regarded Brahmsians found that almost half of their tempos relate to a previous movement's tempo proportionally.
Another mid-European worthy of revival is Franz Schmidt, clearly a Brahmsian disciple.
Two sets of songs by Fuchs were reviewed in the January/February 2007 issue of the Journal, where substantial background was given on Fuchs and his place in the Brahmsian circle of nineteenth century Vienna.
The issues surrounding Vaughan Williams's cultural nationalism are indeed complex, and Michael Vaillancourt's study, 'Coming of Age: the Earliest Orchestral Music of Ralph Vaughan Williams', traces through eight early unpublished works his development from a marked Brahmsian influence towards a modal, folksong-based style.
This refreshing Grieg threw up some Brahmsian moments, and it was Brahms' Third Symphony which concluded the afternoon.
1876-77), while a sense of Liszt's fascination with thematic transformation pervades the freely designed Fantasie Sonata of 1878, and a more mature, controlled Brahmsian approach characterizes the late D-Major Sonata of 1888.
Pope points out that Fuchs "does not imitate the depth of Brahmsian characteristics, but illuminates a most subtle and delicate inner radiance in music and text that hints at the Mahlerian characteristics to come."
The post-modernist concoction of a portion of keyboard on a plate is in Brahmsian dark colours, but otherwise it misses the spirit of this exceptional recording in every respect.
Needless to say it is quite Brahmsian, and if not a masterpiece is well worth hearing, deserving a place in the concert hall.
Both operas show certain typically Stanfordian characteristics: a straightforward approach to rhythm, avoiding syncopation; vocal primacy backed by accompaniment and correspondingly little counterpoint; an avoidance of regular periodization; the harmonization of all material; a tendency towards flatwards modulation; and a Brahmsian orchestral style with added colour.
In the Seventh - though the most Brahmsian of Dvorak's symphonies - you could smell the Bohemian woods and fields - one glorious tune after another.
This song sounds the most Brahmsian of the two sets.