Brahui


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Brahui

(bräho͞o`ē), Dravidian language of Baluchistan. See Dravidian languagesDravidian languages
, family of about 23 languages that appears to be unrelated to any other known language family. The Dravidian languages are spoken by more than 200 million people, living chiefly in S and central India and N Sri Lanka.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Brahui

 

a people living mainly in western Pakistan (Baluchistan, Sind) and also as neighbors or intermingled with the Baluchi population in several areas of Iran and Afghanistan. Total population, about 600,000 (1967 estimate). The Brahui language has no writing system and is related to the Dravidian languages, although it does not display a close relationship to any language of southern India. The language is divided into a series of dialects. Their religion is Islam of the Sunnite sect. Their occupations are seminomadic and nomadic cattle raising and, to some extent, farming. A small group of Brahui living in the Turkmen SSR is gradually merging with the Baluchi.

REFERENCES

Census of India, 1911, vol. 1, parts 1–2. Calcutta, 1913.
Census of India, 1941, vol. 14. Delhi, 1941–43.
Bray, D. The Life History of a Brāhūi. London, 1913.
References in periodicals archive ?
International linguists and historians have devoted a lot of time and energy into studying Brahui since the 19th century.
1.1.2 The Brahuis are members of a tribal confederation, usually the Brahui Confederation, but other Balochi confederations occur as well.
Kalat region is dominated by Baloch Brahui speakers.
Swidler, W.W., (1972), Some Demographic Factors Regulating the Formation of Flocks and Camps Among the Brahui of Baluchistan, in William Irons and Neville Dyson-Hudson, eds., Perspectives on Nomadism, Leiden: Brill.
Leading linguists from all over the world declared Brahui an ancient language during a seminar called International Conference on Brahui Language and Culture, held at Allama Iqbal Open University, Islamabad.
Languages: Urdu (national and official), English, Punjabi, Sindhi, Pashto, Baloch, Hindko, Brahui, Saraiki (Punjabi variant).
The statistics for percentage of people having major languages as their mother tongue is: Punjabi 48%, Sindhi 12%, Siraiki (a Punjabi variant) 10%, Pashtu 8%, Balochi 3%, Hindko 2%, Brahui 1%, Burushaski and other 8%.
Because Afghanistan has not had a systematic census in decades, precise demographic figures are unavailable; the CIA estimates the ethnic breakdown of the population to be: "Pashtun 42%, Tajik 27%, Hazara 9%, Uzbek 9%, Aimak 4%, Turkmen 3%, Baloch 2%" with 4% of the population constituted by other ethnicities such as Kirghiz, Wakhi, Farsiwan, Nuristani, Brahui, Qizilbash, Kabuli, and Jat.
It contains 16 papers by scholars from diverse fields in the humanities and social sciences focusing on ethnic, socioeconomic, religious, linguistic, and cultural pluralism is Balochistan, an arid region located in the Iranian Plateau in Asia, between Pakistan, Iran, and Afghanistan and named after the Baloch tribes speaking Balochi, Pashto, Persian, Hazaragi, and Brahui languages.
The translation is now available in Arabic, Burmese, English, Malayalam, Zulu, Persian, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Urdu, Sindhi, Tegalog, Chinese, Tamil, Dory, Othmani, Hausa, Thai, Turkish, Greek, German, Indonesian, Korean, Warsh, Kaloon, Kazakh, Kashmiri, Macedonian, Albanian, Brahui, Chichewa, Yoruba, Anko, Somali and Bosnian languages.
Eleven percent speak Sindhi, and the remaining 24 percent are other languages, such as Saraiki, Baluchi, and Brahui. Urdu, Punjabi, Pushtu, and Baluchi are of the Indo-European language group, while Brahui is believed to have a Dravidian origin.
The majority of people living in Balochistan province speak either Balochi or Brahui.