injury

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Related to Brain injury: Head injury, Acquired brain injury

injury

Law a violation or infringement of another person's rights that causes him harm and is actionable at law

injury

[′in·jə·rē]
(medicine)
A structural or functional stress or trauma that induces a pathologic process.
Damage resulting from the stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
The handbook is also recommended for family members, teachers, carers or colleagues, providing a detailed explanation of brain injury and how the disability - which is often described as hidden - can affect young people's day to day lives.
However, after a period of 15 years, the risk of dementia diagnosis was found increased by about 80 per cent in those who had at least one traumatic brain injury compared to those who did not have one.
Being under the influence can affect your balance, and falls can certainly lead to brain injury," DePrima says.
For instance, MINDSOURCE funds case management through the Brain Injury Alliance of Colorado (BIAC) to all Coloradans who are living with the effects of a traumatic brain injury free of charge.
The card also includes a unique 24-hour criminal legal helpline managed by a firm of solicitors trained in understanding brain injury.
Prince Harry meets brain injury survivor Dominic Hurley during a visit to Headway
To further assist brain injury victims and their families, Jim Dodson Law is offering a $1,500 college scholarship.
If there's a step backwards--if brain injury symptoms return--do exactly what you'd do if your ankle started to hurt again: back off the activity and allow more time to heal.
Last month she spoke publicly about her experience at an event to raise awareness about Merseycare's brain injury services.
The Children's Trust is the UK's leading charity for children with brain injury.
Previous studies show the rate of traumatic brain injury among adolescents who are not incarcerated is about 15 percent to 30 percent, said Dr.
For the study, researchers looked at the records of adults who went to the emergency department or were admitted to a hospital for TBI or other trauma with no brain injury in the state of California during a five-year period.

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