bran

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bran,

outer coat of a cereal grain—e.g., wheat, rye, and corn—mechanically removed from commercial flour and meal by bolting or sifting. Wheat bran is extensively used as feed for farm animals. Bran is used as food for humans (in cereals or mixed with flour in bread) to add roughage (i.e., cellulose) to the diet. It is also used in dyeing and calico printing.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bran

 

a miling by-product consisting of the seed coat of various grains and the remains of unsorted flour. There are wheat, rye, barley, rice, buckwheat, and other types of bran. Depending on the degree of pulverization, bran may be coarse or fine. Bran, primarily wheat and rye bran, is a valuable feed for all types of agricultural animals. The nutritional value of bran depends on the content of flour particles (the less flour and the more shell, the lower the nutritional value). The average composition of wheat bran is 14.8 percent water, 15.5 percent protein, 3.2 percent fat, 8.4 percent cellulose, 53.2 percent nitrogen-free extractive substances, and 4.9 percent ash. One hundred kg of bran contains 71–78 feed units and 12.5–13 kg of digestible protein. A high bran content in bread reduces digestibility, whereas a small amount of bran improves the taste of the bread and increases peristalsis. Flax bran is used for poultices, and mustard bran for mustard plasters. Almond bran is used as a softening agent for the face and hands.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Bran

god whose cauldron restored dead to life. [Welsh Myth.: Jobes, 241]
See: Death

Bran

god whose cauldron restored the dead to life. [Welsh Myth.: Jobes, 241]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bran

husks of cereal grain separated from the flour by sifting
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Papadopoulos, "Homogeneous fluxes, branes and a maximally supersymmetric solution of M-theory," Journal of High Energy Physics, no.
The dual picture is the intersecting D5 and D1 branes such that (N, [N.sub.f])-strings can end on D5branes, but they must act as sources of second Chern class or instanton number in the world volume theory of the D5branes.
"The black branes are hydro-dynamic objects, that is to say that they have the properties of a liquid.
An interbrane force pulls the two sheets together, amplifying quantum ripples and creating wrinkles in the branes.
This geometric picture, which relies on the relative motion of branes to drive inflation, is now central to string-theory models.
In the case reviewed by the superior court, Branes Southard underwent spinal fusion surgery in 1992 at Temple University Hospital.
Bion is a system which has been constructed of two branes which are connected by a wormhole.
By discussing the solutions and the potentials for this particular case we end by the system D1[perpendicular to]D3 branes gets a special property because of the presence of electric field; the system is divided to two regions corresponding to small and large electric field.
But string theory provides a mechanism by which our brane could interact with other branes, with profound implications for astronomy and cosmology.
The model has two branes which are called "Planck" and "TeV" branes; also it is assumed that a slice of Ad[S.sub.5] spacetime exists between the branes.
The treatment of physical and mathematical aspects of Dirichlet branes is organized around Kontsevich's homological mirror symmetry conjecture, and the Strominger-Yau-Zaslo conjecture.