Branhamella


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Branhamella

[‚bran·ə′mel·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of bacteria in the family Neisseriaceae; cocci occur in pairs with flattened adjacent sides; parasites of mammalian mucous membranes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coinfection of influenza a virus with other bacterial species: Several studies has been done in animal models after recognition that bacterial super infection usually accompanied fatal influenza during Spanish influenza epidemic in 1918, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Branhamella catarrhalis were frequently isolated (Abraham et al., 2007).
Bista M et al [9] showed Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae and in Agarwal A et al [14] Streptococcus viridans and Branhamella catarrhalis (71.13%).
They were initially included in genus Neisseria and later transferred to genus Branhamella and finally got the status of their own [5].
showed that treatment with an anthocyanin-standardized elderberry extract exhibited a dose-dependent reduction in bacterial growth of Streptococcus species and Branhamella catarrhalis, which often causes infections of the upper respiratory tract.
catarrhalis bacteremic pneumonia with the following index words: Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis bacteremic pneumonia.
Moraxella catarrhalis, also known as Micrococcus catarrhalis, Neisseria catarrhalis, or Branhamella catarrhalis is a gram-negative, aerobic, oxidase-positive diplococcus.
pneumoniae and Branhamella catarhalis (Moraxella catarhalis) (1,5,25,26).
Adenovirus serotype 1 does not act synergistically with Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis to induce otitis media in the chinchilla.
An extract of Sambucus nigra L (black elderberry) was found to have antimicrobial activity in vitro against the gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes and group C and G Streptococci, against the grarn-negative bacterium Branhamella catarrhalis, and against human influenza viruses.
Respiratory tract carrier rates of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis in adults and children and interpretation of the isolation of M.