Brans-Dicke theory


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Brans–Dicke theory

(branz dik) A relativistic theory of gravitation put forward in the 1960s by Carl Brans and Robert Dicke as a variant of Einstein's general theory of relativity. It is considered by many astronomers to be the most serious alternative to general relativity. It is a scalar-tensor theory, i.e. a theory in which the gravitational force on an object is due partly to the interaction with a scalar field and partly to a tensor interaction. Newton's gravitational constant is replaced by a slowly varying scalar field. The effect is to allow the strength of gravity to decrease with time. In the limit that this variation is zero, the various Brans–Dicke theories of gravitation that now exist reduce to Einstein's general relativity. Current observations limit the variation of Newton's gravitational constant to be less than one part in 1010 per year. This means that for local applications of a noncosmological nature Brans–Dicke theory is indistinguishable from general relativity.

Brans-Dicke theory

[¦bränz ¦dik ‚thē·ə·rē]
(relativity)
A theory of gravitation in which the gravitational field is described by the tensor field of general relativity and by a new scalar field, which is determined by the distribution of mass-energy in the universe and replaces the gravitational constant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yousefi, "Generalized ghost dark energy in Brans-Dicke theory," Canadian Journal of Physics, vol.
When the author was reading a paper [19] about the Mach principle and Brans-Dicke theory of gravity to develop his electric redshift mechanism in accord with the five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field [20], an idea that the universe is a black hole came to his mind [21].
The rest of the book is organized in sections on GRT, relativistic cosmology, and scalar-tensor theories, covering areas including Schwarzschild's metric and classical experimental tests, Brans-Dicke theory and cosmology, and cosmological lambda models.
Moniz, "Modified Brans-Dicke theory in arbitrary dimensions," Classical and Quantum Gravity, vol.
Shojaie, "On dynamics of Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation," International Journal of Theoretical Physics, vol.
The Brans-Dicke theory can be obtained setting [omega] = const and [lambda] = 0.
The Brans-Dicke theory [37] is a generalized form of general relativity and it is one of the most enchanting examples of scalar tensor theories of gravitation.
In this paper, we have studied interacting and non-interacting DE and DM in the anisotropic Bianchi type-I universe in the framework of Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation.
La Camera, "Wormholes in the Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation," Physical Review D: Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology, vol.
The Brans-Dicke theory (BDT) of gravity is the one of the most successful alternative theories among all alternative theories of gravitation.
Theories corresponding to the addition of scalar degrees of freedom include quintessence (e.g., [240-242]) and coupled quintessence (e.g., [243]) theories, the Chern-Simons theory (e.g., [244]), Cuscuton cosmology (e.g., [245-247]), Chaplygin gases (e.g., [248,249]), torsion theories such as f(T) theories (e.g., [250-253], see also, e.g., [254-264] for recent work) or the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory (e.g., [265-268]), scalar-tensor theories (e.g., [269]) such as the Brans-Dicke theory [270], ghost condensates (e.g., [271]), galileons (e.g., [272, 273]), KGB [274], Horndeski's theory [275], and many others.
Waheed, "Anisotropic universe models in Brans-Dicke theory," European Physical Journal C, vol.