Bratslav

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Bratslav

 

an urban-type settlement in Nemirov Raion, Vinnitsa Oblast, Ukrainian SSR, located on the Iuzhnyi Bug River and the Vinnitsa-Iampol’ highway, 11 km from the Karolina railroad station. Population, 4, 500 (1968). Bratslav has a brewery, a bakery, and a brickyard. There is an agricultural technicum for the study of bookkeeping.

References in periodicals archive ?
The notes closed by invoking the Baal Shem Tov and Nachman of Bratzlav, before noting: "In his own way, Shlomo seeks to follow their road.
For a mystic like the great Hasidic leader Rebbe Nahman of Bratzlav, genuine Shalom means the harmonization of apparent opposites while retaining the distinctiveness of each.
Nahman of Bratzlav, Sefer ha-Middot, item Tzaddiq, part II no.
A Hasidic aphorism attributed to Rebbe Nachman of Bratzlav, as well as the Kotzker Rebbe, expresses it with poetic power: "Nothing is as whole as a broken heart.
Tuning the soul; music as a spiritual process in the teachings of Rabbi Nahman of Bratzlav.
Uman possesses a Jewish pilgrimage site, the grave of Rabbi Nachman of Bratzlav, who codified and propagated the words of the founder of Hasidism, the Ba'al Shem Tov.
Rabbi Nachman of Bratzlav once wrote, "Remember, things can go from the very worst -- to the very best, in just the blink of an eye.
Drawing from an impressive roster of original sources ranging from Maimonides, to Nachman of Bratzlav, to Theodor Herzle, Rabbi Steinberg provides readers with histories and insights into these Judaic celebrations including the prayers, rituals, and stories associated with each of them.
One night about a year ago, I happened upon a website that told of a gravesite in Uman, Ukraine of Rabbi Nachman of Bratzlav (April 4, 1772-October 16, 1810), the great-grandson of the founder of Hasidism.
Turning from Wessely to Nahman of Bratzlav, we not only move a thousand miles to the east, to the Ukraine, but from the world of Enlightenment Berlin to Hasidic, mystical Podolia.
Cott also finds something of Dylan in the thirteenth-century Carmina Burana, in the fifteenth-century French poet Francois villon, the sixteenth-century Chinese philosopher Li Chih and the eighteenth-century Hasidic master Rabbi Nachman of Bratzlav.
Rabbi Nakhman of Bratzlav said: "The whole world is one long narrow bridge, so it is essential not to be afraid.