Brayton cycle


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Brayton cycle

[′brāt·ən ‚sī·kəl]
(thermodynamics)
A thermodynamic cycle consisting of two constant-pressure processes interspersed with two constant-entropy processes. Also known as complete-expansion diesel cycle; Joule cycle.

Brayton cycle

A thermodynamic cycle (also variously called the Joule or complete expansion diesel cycle) consisting of two constant-pressure (isobaric) processes interspersed with two reversible adiabatic (isentropic) processes.

The thermal efficiency for a given gas, air, is solely a function of the ratio of compression. This is also the case with the Otto cycle. For the diesel cycle with incomplete expansion, the thermal efficiency is lower.

The Brayton cycle, with its high inherent thermal efficiency, requires the maximum volume of gas flow for a given power output. The Otto and diesel cycles require much lower gas flow rates, but have the disadvantage of higher peak pressures and temperatures. These conflicting elements led to many designs, all attempting to achieve practical compromises. With the development of fluid acceleration devices for the compression and expansion of gases, the Brayton cycle found mechanisms which could economically handle the large volumes of working fluid. This is perfected in the gas turbine power plant. See Gas turbine, Thermodynamic cycle

Brayton cycle

A name given to the thermodynamic cycle of a gas turbine engine to provide thrust. This is varying the volume constant pressure cycle of events and is commonly called the constant pressure cycle. Also called a continuous combustion cycle because of four constant and continuous events (i.e., intake, compression, expansion including power, and exhaust). It is named after George B. Brayton—an American engineer. Also called a Joule cycle. (See page 121)
References in periodicals archive ?
He said, This technology is focused on the utilization of Qatars abundant natural resources to combine renewable energy and waste heat reduction to seamlessly complement electric energy generated by burning of inexpensive natural gas through a clean oxy-combustion process, using super-critical carbon dioxide as working fluid in a semi-closed Brayton cycle. When the sun is not shining and natural gas is burnt with oxygen, clean water and additional carbon dioxide is produced in the combustion process.
Therefore, SC[O.sub.2] Brayton Cycle is considered to be one of the most promising energy transfer and energy conversion schemes in nuclear reactors.
Closed supercritical carbon dioxide (S-C[O.sub.2]) Brayton cycle is considered as a promising substitute for steam Rankine cycle applied to thermal power generation.
[LLNL] To a lesser degree, we have natural gas fueled Brayton Cycle gas turbines (some in a combined cycle configuration), hydropower, and an increasing amount of solar photovoltaic and wind power in the national grid.
The reactor would be attached to an open air Brayton cycle power conversion system.
A nitrogen heat exchanger using a closed Brayton cycle will transfer the heat to a turbine and generator set or output it for direct use.
Approximating a thermodynamic Brayton cycle, the closed cycle gas turbine has two heat exchangers, one for rejecting heat from working fluid entering the compressor and one for energy addition to flow entering the turbine.
Sun, "Exergoeconomic performance optimization for a combined cooling, heating and power generation plant with an endoreversible closed Brayton cycle," Mathematical and Computer Modelling, vol.
In their work, solar energy is used as the only heat source to drive a closed Brayton cycle to generate power.
Burlington, MA, December 15, 2012 --(PR.com)-- Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle is one of the latest advances in the development of power conversion technologies for bulk thermal and nuclear generation of electricity.
Performance comparison of an irreversible closed Brayton cycle under maximum power density and maximum power conditions.
A "combined cycle power plant" is described as a combination of gas turbine generator (Brayton cycle) with turbine exhaust waste directed to heat boiler and steam turbine generator (Rankine cycle) for the production of electric power.