Nehushtan

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Related to Brazen serpent: Nehushtan

Nehushtan

(nēhŭsh`tăn), in the Bible, brazen serpent made by Moses. It was eventually worshiped by the Israelites, and Hezekiah destroyed it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Brazen Serpent appears in the background on the left.
Two motifs in particular, Christ in Judgment and the Brazen Serpent, mitigate the strict bisection the composition of Law and Gospel may suggest.
The Brazen Serpent (Numbers 21: 6-9), which appears on the law side of the Gotha panel, complicates the division between law and gospel in a way similar to Christ in Judgment.
Because it exemplifies faith, the Brazen Serpent belongs more properly with Christ than with Moses, even though it is an Old Testament story.
Cranach was following the familiar typological tradition, in which the Brazen serpent signified a type and the Crucifixion an antitype, when he placed the Brazen Serpent on the law side of the earliest versions of Law and Gospel.
Even though the brazen serpent, when it appears on the gospel side in the later versions of the picture, mitigates the contrast, the emphasis on death vs.
The story of the Brazen Serpent appears on the gospel side, not the law side, of both drawings.
Donald Ehresmann, "The Brazen Serpent, a Reformation Motif in the Works of Lucas Cranach the Elder and His Workshop," Marsyas 13 (1967) 36 n.
On the Brazen Serpent in Law and Gospel, see Ehresmann, 32-47.
On Melanchthon and Luther vis a vis their influence on Reformation art, particularly the use of the Brazen Serpent, see Ehresmann 34, who asserts that the specific influence of Luther or Melanchthon matters less than the role of the Brazen Serpent as an unmistakable symbol of the early Reformation.
The show's centrepiece is his monumental Moses and the Brazen Serpent and the Transfiguration of Jesus of 1683 (pictured), which has never been exhibited outside the artist's native Mexico.