apnea

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apnea

[′ap·nē·ə]
(medicine)
A transient cessation of respiration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) and maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), breath holding time at end-expiration (BHTe), and breath holding time at end-inspiration (BHTi) were recorded, and 40 mmHg test was performed for all the volunteers at rest which formed the control readings.
Breath holding spells in 91 children and response to treatment with iron.
In the present study, a total of 115 children were diagnosed as Breath holding spells between 6 months and 60 months.
It could have been better to use the same breath holding technique to evaluate the test-retest repeatability.
Campbell, "Mechanical and chemical control of breath holding," Quarterly Journal of Experimental Physiology and Cognate Medical Sciences, vol.
To avoid any hemodynamic and respiratory signal changes related either to breath holding or to inspiration or expiration movements, we considered for baseline BOLD signal the instants when the subject was looking at the green screen and excluded 4 s of the signal that preceded the yellow screen presentation and 60 s after the red screen.
It has been reported that long-term practice of yoga leads to a greater control of respiratory musculature and the ability to consciously override the normal physiological stimuli of respiratory centers.[11] This may be the reason for higher values of breath holding time in the case group.
Breath Holding Regarding breath-holding duration, none of the six correlations with self-reports were significant, and none of the seven correlations with IRAP latencies or D-scores were significant.
A T1W-GRE sequence obtained using a radial acquisition scheme offers a solution to the major technical challenge encountered in MRI of motion artifact and the associated need for breath holding, a main limitation of traditional abdomen, pediatric, and neck MRI examinations.
* second and third immersions were performed with breath holding to maximum by volitional effort.
When comparing standing balance in the athletes and non-athletes during different modes of ventilation (hyperventilation and inspiratory breath holding) we obtained the following main results: