Brecht


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Brecht

Bertolt . 1898--1956, German dramatist, theatrical producer, and poet, who developed a new style of "epic" theatre and a new theory of theatrical alienation, notable also for his wit and compassion. His early works include The Threepenny Opera (1928) and Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (1930) (both with music by Kurt Weill). His later plays are concerned with moral and political dilemmas and include Mother Courage and her Children (1941), The Good Woman of Setzuan (1943), and The Caucasian Chalk Circle (1955)
References in periodicals archive ?
As for how to take care of specific produce, here are tips from Brecht.
This is one of many "historical fictions" scattered throughout the text, from supplements to Brecht's Messingkauf Dialogues to "speculative reconstructions of theatre events for which historical facts are missing" (3).
At Alexan's suggestion, Dessau played his setting of "Kampflied der schwarzen Strohhute" (Fighting Song of the Black Straw Hats) for Brecht, who, pleased by the song, immediately included it on a musical program (a "Brecht Abend") at the Studio Theater of the New School for Social Research in New York City.
Performance of the play by Bertolt Brecht. Until April 24.
I was interested in Herbert Blau at the Actor's Workshop in San Francisco; he did some of my Brecht adaptations.
But advertising hasn't learned anything from Brecht. Mostpeople in advertising can't do interruption well, so they pretend the answer is not to do it at all.
I will argue that the early modern theater in several important ways resembled what Brecht would later call the "epic" theater, but that we might more easily recognize that theaters contributions to a socially resonant dramatic praxis by looking beyond Shakespeare and the Globe to Thomas Heywood and the Red Bull.
BEIRUT: Stage director Nagy Souraty and founder of Masrah al-Madina Nidal al-Achkar have collaborated on a unique project this winter -- together they have given Bertolt Brecht's "Mother Courage and Her Children" a makeover.
There is little doubt amongst critics and commentators concerning the general fact of Brecht's debt to Marxist dialectics or his intention to apply it to the theatre.