Bretons


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Bretons

 

a nationality in France, on the Armorican Peninsula. Population, about 1.1 million (1967 estimate). The Breton language survives in everyday speech, mainly among peasants and sailors, while French is the school, administrative, and literary language. The population is Catholic. The Bretons are descendants of the Britons, a Celtic tribe that moved from the British Isles in the fifth and sixth centuries, and of local Romanized Celts. The main occupations are fishing, oyster dredging, navigation, and agriculture.

REFERENCE

Narody zarubezhnoi Evropy, vol. 2. Moscow, 1965.
References in periodicals archive ?
'If you go to rural areas, to the very small villages or farmhouses in the west, people aged over 50 usually will be able to speak some Breton, perhaps quite a bit of it.
As a brief survey and synthesis of pre-historic, ancient, and medieval Brittany, The Bretons is well written and interesting.
expanding the emergency department at the Cape Breton Regional Hospital in Sydney
For the last 30 years, the Vince Ryan Memorial Scholarship Hockey Tournament Society has been a fixture of the winter Cape Breton tourism season, filling hotels and restaurants with visitors.
The Pariahs of Yesterday: Breton Migrants in Paris.
Until the arrival of the railroad around the middle of the nineteenth century, Breton migration was distinct in that Bretons migrated internationally more than people from most parts of France, but were less likely to migrate internally.
[bar] SIR - James Samuel Cole of Castell Nedd wrote (March 11) about the battle between the English and French armies when Welsh and Breton soldiers in both armies refused to fight on hearing each other singing the same song.
Changing social and economic circumstances in the region also spurred the emigration of rural Bretons to larger towns and cities within the region as well as to Paris and other parts of France--where they were often less inclined to don traditional dress.
He told us: "During the early 1900s more than 50,000 people in Cape Breton spoke Irish as their first language.
"Breton doesn't need to receive special treatment," explained Le Lay, "but clearly not all problems can be resolved in Paris or in Brussels.
Hence the chagrin of a Cambridge graduate on addressing Bretons in Breton; they would insist on replying in French, considering his use of Breton to them as an insulting implication that they were yokels.
DCBA understands that our visitors value discovering Cape Bretons culture - which is often the highlight of festivals and events - and these experiences are a primary driver of visitation to the Island.