Brewster's angle


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Brewster's angle

[¦brü·stərz ¦aŋ·gəl]
(optics)
The angle of incidence of light reflected from a dielectric surface at which the reflectivity for light whose electrical vector is in the plane of incidence becomes zero; given by Brewster's law. Also known as polarizing angle.
References in periodicals archive ?
for parallel polarization, the reflection coefficient reduces to zero at Brewster's angle [[theta].
Figure 15 and Figure 16 show the change in magnitude of reflection coefficient and Brewster's angle with change in dimension.
z] < 0, and discuss the existence of the Brewster's angle for different chiral parameters.
It is found from the calculation that, for TM incident wave, the Brewster's angle [[theta].
There is no Brewster's angle appears for TE incident wave (Fig.
Beyond incident angles of [+ or -]30[degrees], the error rises, reaching 10% at [+ or -]40[degrees] and worsening as Brewster's angle is approached.
In the typical case for an air dielectric interface, Brewster's angle can easily be calculated as arctan[square root][epsilon], where [epsilon] is the dielectric constant of the be ad material.
Figure 7 shows curves calculated from the theoretical reflection coefficient magnitudes of two cases: first for normal incidence, and second for oblique incidence at Brewster's angle.
Because of this, it is possible to install only part of the dielectric in the vicinity of center conductor at Brewster's angle.
For parallel polarization case, Brewster's angle can also be formulated.
which are the same expressions as those obtained by Balanis [31] for transmission, reflection coefficients and Brewster's angle for parallel polarization.
It can be observed that Brewster's angle for parallel polarization changes considerably with changing dimensions.