Brewster's angle

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Brewster's angle

[¦brü·stərz ¦aŋ·gəl]
(optics)
The angle of incidence of light reflected from a dielectric surface at which the reflectivity for light whose electrical vector is in the plane of incidence becomes zero; given by Brewster's law. Also known as polarizing angle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fluorescence from the films is imaged at macroscopic scales using a digital camera, and microscopic images are taken using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM).
As a result, there is only one reflectance dip at the Brewster angle ([[theta].sub.B]) among the reflectance that changes with the angle.
The polarization of reflection changes along with the incoming elevation angle, especially at around the Brewster angle. Fresnel formulas can quantify this transformation [13].
Operating at the Brewster angle with TM-polarization minimized the front surface reflection and maximized signal penetration.
By substituting this value into the Brewster angle formula we have [[theta].sub.Brewster] = atan(8.113) [approximately equal to] 82.97 degrees.
In creating a directional light filter, MIT physicist Yichen Shen and his team knew that at the interface between any pair of materials, light arriving from one specific angle, known as the Brewster angle, can simply pass through unimpeded --it won't get reflected or bent.
In electromagnetics, Brewster angle is defined as angle of incidence for which reflection power is zero.
Fenniche, "Mirror effect at the Brewster angle in semiconductor rectangular gratings," Phys.
In the second case, the angle of reflection is a Brewster angle and the perpendicular polarization coefficient is only calculated because the parallel one is automatically equal to zero.
The idea is to replace the fixed polarizer with reflected light near the Brewster angle of water (a 53 [degrees] angle of incidence).