bricolage

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bricolage

the process of transforming the meaning of objects or symbols through novel uses or unconventional arrangements of unrelated things. The term is used in CULTURAL STUDIES; see FASHION.

Bricolage is a French term and was introduced, in a somewhat different context, by Claude LÉVI-STRAUSS in The Savage Mind, and subsequently used by his translators who could find no suitable English equivalent. He used it to refer to the (bricoleur's) practice of creating things out of whatever materials come to hand – the structure and the outcome being more important than the constituent parts which themselves are changed through the act of creation.

Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense, it has also reacted frequently to emergent social needs as a bricoleur rearranging existing resources in an unusual way.
[beaucoup moins que]Le marchAaAaAeA@ des magasins spAaAaAeA@cialisAaAaAeA@s est encore dans une phase embryon puisque le Marocain n'est pas bricoleur....Et comme, nous AaAaAeA@voluo dans un marchAaAaAeA@ qui n'est pas encore saturAaAaAeA@, nous considAaAaAeA@rons do nous avons le temps pour chercher d'autres investisseurs et d'autres opportunitAaAaAeA@s[beaucoup plus grand que], avait dAaAaAeA@clarAaAaAeA@ il y a qu semaines AaAaAeA la presse Mohamed Filali Chahad, le PDG de l'enseign
Finally, a strong presence of Bricoleur Entrepreneurs is observed, who prioritize attributes of improvisation, sense of opportunity and adaptability.
(12) This incipiently feminist process has a history going back to the eighteenth century, as David Porter attests, which cast women as "the aesthetic bricoleurs of the new commercial society," who worked with fragments, abstracting meaning from objects that were in danger of becoming mere detritus in the new world of their habitation (p.
But at the Met Breuer, Diane Arbus seems more of a bricoleur and a semi-bored collector of tics and gestures.
In short, Barbour makes a fair case for re-reading Marx as the bricoleur of discursive assemblages even if the overall depiction of Marx and Althusser will be disappointing for many.