Bride


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What does it mean when you dream about a bride?

In Jungian psychology, dream images of a bride or bridegroom may embody the anima (in males) or the animus (in females). Traditionally, brides symbolize purity and innocence. Beyond the obvious meanings of a spouse or spouse-to-be, a bride or a bridegroom can also represent someone else with whom we are in a partnership (e.g., a business partner). (See also Marriage.)

References in classic literature ?
Now she was so frightened that she did not see it; but her maid saw it, and was very glad, for she knew the charm; and she saw that the poor bride would be in her power, now that she had lost the hair.
How silly men are, though, in this position," he said to Tchirikov, when Levin, after looking absently at him, had moved back to his bride.
The bride and bridegroom talk and laugh apart, as has always been their manner; and the Buffers work their way through the dishes with systematic perseverance, as has always been THEIR manner; and the pokey unknowns are exceedingly benevolent to one another in invitations to take glasses of champagne; but Mrs Podsnap, arching her mane and rocking her grandest, has a far more deferential audience than Mrs Veneering; and Podsnap all but does the honours.
Nay, I must not put finger to string until the bride and groom have come.
Well, purty soon all the Glen and Four Winds people knew the schoolmaster's bride was coming, and they were all glad because they thought so much of him.
James Williams's wife--his bride of two weeks--looked him in the face with a strange, soft radiance in her eyes and a flush on her cheeks, looked him in the face and said:
yes, but not without my bride," answered he, in the same hollow accents.
When the bride saw it she wanted to have it, but the maid would only give it her on condition that she should sleep for the third time by the Prince's door.
The bride drove up quietly with her father, and there was a subdued note even in the murmur of recognition which ran along the villagers as they stood in groups near the church porch.
After several pipes had been filled and emptied in this solemn ceremonial, the chief addressed the bride, detailing at considerable length the duties of a wife which, among Indians, are little less onerous than those of the pack-horse; this done, he turned to her friends and congratulated them upon the great alliance she had made.
At these words, said with tears of joy, the bride forgot her sufferings; for she had indeed suffered in presenting herself before the public to obtain a happiness her parents refused to sanction.
The little bride hid her face on the groom's shoulder and sobbed.