Brinell test

Brinell test

[brə′nel ‚test]
(engineering)
A test to determine the hardness of a material, in which a steel ball 1 centimeter in diameter is pressed into the material with a standard force (usually 3000 kilograms); the spherical surface area of indentation is measured and divided into the load; the results are expressed as Brinell number.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Janka test is not widely accepted in Europe, because there is a considerable possibility of failure owing to cell wall compression, and because of the more reliable results of the Brinell test compared with those of the Janka test (Schwab 1990, Niemz and Sttibi 2000, Hirata et al.
For the measuring of the hardness the Brinell test was used.
The Brinell test measures resistance to indentation and is a common technique used to determine the hardness of castings.
This adaptability means that Equotip hardness testing remains virtually non-destructive, while a Rockwell or a Brinell test often requires scrapping the object after the test.
There have been many studies that deal with indentation tests using different indenter geometries, such as a spherical indenter (Brinell test), a conical indenter (Cone hardness, HG, O'Neill (2)) and a diamond pyramid indenter (Vickers test, or HV).
There are several types of hardness tests, including the Brinell test, the Rockwell test, the Vickers test and the durometer test.
Although the Brinell test is widely known as one of the most accurate test methods for hardness testing of metals, error in the reading of the indentation size results in measurement errors of 0.1 mm between operators -- the range is even greater between labs.
Parts are loaded into the cell, and a carousel moves them to the Brinell test and onto the PCRT test station, which uses a single electronics package to alternately test left and right knuckles.
Hochstein describes the Brinell test as "...one of the few working tools we have, but it's certainly only part of the equation when determining machinability." Hachtman calls the Brinell test "inconsistent at best" as a reading for machinability.
The standard Brinell test uses a 10mm ball under three different load levels: 500kg, 1500kg and 3000kg.
The most common method of measuring hardness in the foundry is the Brinell test, which is particularly effective on soft materials.