Brinton, Crane

Brinton, Crane

(Clarence Crane Brinton), 1898–1968, American historian, b. Winsted, Conn. He received his Ph.D. from Oxford in 1923 and began teaching at Harvard the same year, becoming full professor in 1942. He wrote extensively on the history of Western political and moral philosophy and was an expert on the dynamics of revolutionary movements. His many books include A Decade of Revolution (1934), The Anatomy of Revolution (1938, rev. ed. 1965), Ideas and Men (1950, 2d ed. 1963), A History of Western Morals (1959), The Shaping of Modern Thought (1963), and The Americans and the French (1968).
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Brinton, (Clarence) Crane

(1898–1968) historian, teacher; born in Winsted, Conn. Educated at Harvard and Oxford Universities, he became known as a brilliant, cosmopolitan scholar and author as well as a popular teacher at Harvard (1923–68). He worked for the OSS (Office of Strategic Services) in London (1942–45) during World War II. An authority on revolutions and a proponent of "intellectual history," his 15 books include The Anatomy of Revolution (1938), A History of Western Morals (1959), and The Americans and the French (1968).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.