British


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Related to British: British accent

British

1. relating to or denoting the English language as spoken and written in Britain, esp the S dialect generally regarded as standard
2. relating to or denoting the ancient Britons
3. the natives or inhabitants of Britain
4. the extinct Celtic language of the ancient Britons
References in classic literature ?
In order to compel their obedience, two regiments, consisting of more than seven hundred British soldiers, were sent to Boston.
The venerable councillors could not assemble to consult about the welfare of the province without being challenged by sentinels and passing among the bayonets of the British soldiers.
From a wooded spur of the hills he looked down upon the enemy's left flank and beyond to the British lines.
My well-remembered experience has convinced me that, in that corner of the ocean, once the wind has got to the northward of west (as it did on the 20th, taking the British fleet aback), appearances of westerly weather go for nothing, and that it is infinitely more likely to veer right round to the east than to shift back again.
The English still spoke English, and the British Welsh or Cymric.
said the British Lion, yawning; "the swivel in my tail needs a few drops of oil, that is all.
From the records of the Colonial Office and from the dead man's diary we learn that a certain young English nobleman, whom we shall call John Clayton, Lord Greystoke, was commissioned to make a peculiarly delicate investigation of conditions in a British West Coast African Colony from whose simple native inhabitants another European power was known to be recruiting soldiers for its native army, which it used solely for the forcible collection of rubber and ivory from the savage tribes along the Congo and the Aruwimi.
But British India, properly so called, only embraces seven hundred thousand square miles, and a population of from one hundred to one hundred and ten millions of inhabitants.
In 1762, the French lost possession of Canada, and the trade fell principally into the hands of British subjects.
It would amount to nothing more than the supreme command and direction of the military and naval forces, as first General and admiral of the Confederacy; while that of the British king extends to the declaring of war and to the raising and regulating of fleets and armies -- all which, by the Constitution under consideration, would appertain to the legislature.
But the broadest merriment was excited by a group of figures ridiculously dressed in old regimentals, which seemed to have been purchased at a military rag fair, or pilfered from some receptacle of the cast-off clothes of both the French and British armies.
Besides, all manner of doubt was quickly put out of the question: preparations for the trip were set on foot at London; the factories of Lyons received a heavy order for the silk required for the body of the balloon; and, finally, the British Government placed the transport-ship Resolute, Captain Bennett, at the disposal of the expedition.