British North America

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British North America

(formerly) Canada or its constituent regions or provinces that formed part of the British Empire
References in periodicals archive ?
This is too bad, for one would have welcomed such a book, as the reviewer does not fully comprehend the imagined Catholics of early America, who constituted less than 1 percent of the population in 1776, or the deep psychosis that linked Jesuits and Quakers (of all people), and that led to perception of countless conspiracies orchestrated by the pope and united French colonists in Canada--Jesuits disguised as dancing masters, Indians, and Catholic settlers in British America.
com)-- i-Admin has bid on and won an RFP (Request for Proposal) issued by British America Tobacco Services Limited (B.
More than PS1million of the politicians' pension cash is tied up with British America Tobacco and Imperial Tobacco.
We wondered why Chezza skipped lunch, but then perhaps she had a cigar date with her Cabinet colleague, the former deputy chairman of JTI's rival British America Tobacco, Kenneth Clarke MP.
Moreover, even accepting Ward's limitation to Europe and Britain, the explicit exclusion of Scotland and Ireland leaves significant gaps, particularly in terms of understanding the development of evangelical culture in British America as it moved through its independence movement and would reconstruct itself in the nineteenth century.
Of further interest is Elizabeth Jane Errington's chapter on the movement of peoples between Britain and British America in the years before consolidation.
One anonymous servant of an empire built on trade, he served on ships carrying tea and porcelain from China, sugar and rum from the West Indies, rice and corn from British America, and fruit from the Mediterranean.
As an illustration of his basic method, he rightly notes the popularity of Bickerstaffe's comic opera The Padlock and its blackface servant Mungo, played in British America by Lewis Hallam, Jr.
In A Summary View of the Rights of British America (1774), Thomas Jefferson bases the colonists' claim for independence on the fact that:
Gill provides three case studies--colonial British America, Mexico and Latin America, and Russia and the Baltic States--that illustrate the identifiable and significant changes that occurred over time and test his general theory regarding the origins of religious liberty.
A "dress rehearsal" for revolution; John Trenchard and Thomas Gordon's works in eighteenth-century British America.
By asserting a unity in the disasters colonists confronted, however, this Caribbean-centered view of the colonial world helps to reconstitute colonial British America as a place that included tropical islands as well as mainland settlements and in which plantation enterprise was a central preoccupation.

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