brittle star

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Related to Brittle stars: Feather stars, Sea lilies

brittle star

[¦brid·əl ′stär]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for all members of the echinoderm class Ophiuroidea.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, the researchers looked at five-armed brittle stars and discovered a repeated movement in five fan-shaped parts between the arms that shrink and expand, which they named "pumping."
One pattern of abbreviated development in brittle stars includes a non-feeding vitellaria larva that swims in the plankton for only a few days before metamorphosing into a juvenile (Brooks and Grave, 1899; Mortensen, 1921, 1938; Stancyk, 1973; Hendler, 1982, 1991; Komatsu and Shoshaku, 1993; Selvakumaraswamy and Byrne, 2004; Cisternas and Byrne, 2005; Fourgon et al., 2005).
The scientists found that nearly half of starfish and brittle stars sampled had swallowed microplastics, defined as fragments measuring less than 5mm in size.
The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic and anti-metastatic efficacy of Persian Gulf brittle stars (O.
Bremert & Ormond (1981) reported Arothron hispidus feeding in the Red Sea on coral, tunicates, sea urchins and brittle stars, adding that it is a significant predator of the Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster).
I have developed a laboratory exercise in which students examine the Porifera (sponges), Cnidaria (jellyfish, etc.), Annelida (worms), Mollusca (snails, clams, etc.), Arthropoda (insects, crabs, etc.), Brachiopoda (lamp shells), Echinodermata (brittle stars, urchins, etc.), and Chordata (tunicates) in one session.
"What you saw was a field of brown corals with exposed skeleton - white, brittle stars tightly wound around the skeleton, not waving their arms like they usually do."
It is colonised by marine life, with a dense carpet of plumose anemones , sea urchins and brittle stars.
As the AUV tracked above the bottom at a particularly dynamic area of the reef called Hydrographers Passage, about 200 km off the mainland, a vast sandy dune field supporting an extensive community of the luminescent, suspension feeding brittle stars (relatives of sea stars) came into view for the first time.
"Large, mobile beds of brittle stars (a relative of starfish) occur, along with numerous rare sponges and fish.
Eyeball-like sea anemones spill onto the deck, and multi-legged brittle stars (marine animals that resemble starfish) are everywhere.