Broad Fish Tapeworm


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Broad Fish Tapeworm

 

(Diphyllobothrium latum), also known as the common fish tapeworm, an invertebrate of the class Cestoda, which parasitizes the human intestine and the intestines of some domestic and wild mammals. It measures up to 9 m long (sometimes up to 20 m) and 1–1.5 cm wide. The body consists of several thousand segments, or proglottids, each containing male and female organs. The broad fish tapeworm has a life-span of up to 29 years and sheds up to 2.1 million eggs per day. The life cycle includes two intermediate hosts, first a cope-pod (Cyclops, Diatoma) and then a predatory fish (pike, burbot, perch). The definitive host may be man, dogs, cats, or wild predatory mammals. Broad fish tapeworms are distributed predominantly along freshwater shores. In the USSR they are found in Karelia and the Baltic Region. These tapeworms cause diphyllobothriasis in man.

M. N. DUBININA

References in periodicals archive ?
latum, the broad fish tapeworm, is one of the best studied and broadly distributed species in the genus throughout Asia.
Diphyllobothriasis is an intestinal parasitic disease caused by ingestion of raw or undercooked fish infected with the cestode Diphyllobothrium spp., commonly known as the broad fish tapeworm. Diphyllobothrium does not have hooks or suckers on its scolex like other tapeworms and gets its named from the Greek terms di meaning two, phyllon meaning leaf, and bothrion meaning pit or groove, which are all used to describe the two leaf-shaped grooves (bothria) found on the scolex of the adult tapeworm.
* The growing popularity of eating sushi has caused a rise in human infection from the broad fish tapeworm (Diphyllobothrium latum).