broad-spectrum antibiotic

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broad-spectrum antibiotic

[¦brȯd ¦spek·trəm ‚ant·i·bī′äd·ik]
(microbiology)
An antibiotic that is effective against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial species.
References in periodicals archive ?
United States-based Redx Pharma has found a series of compounds that have the potential to create the first novel class of broad-spectrum antibiotics in 30 years, it was announced yesterday.
The emergence of human and animal pathogens resistant to one or more antibiotics coupled with the realization of the damage inflicted by broad-spectrum antibiotics on the commensal biome has led to an increased focus on bacteriocin modes of action.
These injections are broad-spectrum antibiotics for single-dose daily administration against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and atypical pathogens.
One of the most concerning findings in the recent literature is increased use of broad-spectrum antibiotics to treat common RTIs (Mainous et al.
SAN DIEGO -- Narrow-spectrum antibiotics yield outcomes that are at least comparable to, if not better than, broad-spectrum antibiotics when prescribed to children with appendicitis, according to a retrospective cohort study presented at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies.
62% of children had at least one exposure to narrow-spectrum antibiotics and 41% to broad-spectrum antibiotics.
Prescribing rates for second-line, broad-spectrum antibiotics among outpatients have increased, contributing to a growing problem of antibiotic-resistant infections (10-14).
It may also lead to patients seeking repeat visits after 4 days, or asking for a "better" antibiotic after 8 or 9 days, which results in more prescriptions for broad-spectrum antibiotics.
The overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics can seriously disrupt the body's normal ecological balance, rendering humans more susceptible to bacterial, yeast, and parasitic infections.
The bacterium is often resistant to broad-spectrum antibiotics used in conventional treatments.
The hospitals that tended to have higher antibiotic use also had a higher use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.
Among the drugs being taken more often, the researchers pointed out, are new broad-spectrum antibiotics that are more expensive and more likely to lead to bacterial resistance than older versions.