Broadcast Sowing

Broadcast Sowing

 

the placing of seeds on the soil surface without interrow spacing, the most ancient method of planting. Until the 20th century, broadcast sowing was common in many countries and predominated on peasant farms in Russia. It has now been almost universally replaced by drill seeding.

References in periodicals archive ?
(2011) also reported the maximum grain and biomass yield from ridge and raised bed sowing as compared to conventional broadcast sowing. Similarly, Bakht et al.
At 70 DAS, the maximum LAI was recorded from ridge sowing followed by bed sowing, whereas the lowest LAI was recorded in broadcast sowing (Fig 1 ab).
In case of sowing methods maximum plant height, stem girth and leaves count per plant was observed in ridge sowing, followed by bed sowing, whereas the lowest plant height, stem girth, and leaves count was reported in broadcast sowing (Table 3).
Broadcast sowing often uneven seed assignment in the soil which results in unseen appearance and positions.
Sowing annuals in rows (rather than broadcast sowing them) also makes it easier to see which seedlings are weeds and which are flowers - if they're not in the lines, weed them out!
ridge, drill and broadcast sowing and five N levels viz.
While among the sowing techniques, ridge and drill sowing were found superior than broadcast sowing.
The ridge sowing proved better than drill and broadcast sowing. Ridge sowing exhibited 4.04 t ha-1 paddy yield followed by 3.73 t ha-1 with drill sowing.
N levels (90 and 60 kg N ha-1) and sowing methods (ridge, drill and broadcast sowing) laid out in split plot arrangement with three replications.
The ridge and drill sowing showed least value of ECe and SAR at both levels of N as compared to broadcast sowing.
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