bronchodilator

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bronchodilator

[¦bräŋ·kō′dī‚lād·ər]
(medicine)
An instrument used to increase the caliber of the pulmonary air passages.
(pharmacology)
Any agent that causes a widening of the air passages in bronchi and bronchioles.
References in periodicals archive ?
LABA/LAMA combination therapy seems to be superior to LABA/ICS combination therapy and should be used when long-acting bronchodilator monotherapy fails to control symptoms or reduce exacerbations.
Commonly reported side effects of the adrenergic bronchodilators include headache, nervousness, irritability, anxiety, and insomnia, which are caused by central nervous system stimulation.
Other treatments administered to those who did and did not receive bronchodilators included nebulized 3% saline (37.
Ask your doctor whether an inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting beta-agonist bronchodilator would be preferable to an inhaled anticholinergic.
If the patient developed more persistent symptoms in the future, short-acting bronchodilators may be used regularly (e.
7) It is recommended that one commences treatment with inhaled short-acting bronchodilators either alone or in combination; if that treatment is not successful, one could change to one of the long-acting bronchodilators.
Our findings using longitudinal data demonstrate that adding ICS treatment to regular inhaled bronchodilators for patients with COPD most likely increases total medical expenses initially, although severe exacerbation risks decline and total costs eventually decline.
Asthma medications called bronchodilators are typically designed to be short-acting--they act quickly to stop an asthma attack once it has started by relaxing and opening--"dilating"--the bronchial tubes so more air is available.
Discontinue bronchodilators if patients do not respond quickly, because the bronchodilators may cause respiratory deterioration (Grade of Recommendation: D, expert opinion).
But there are treatments, including bronchodilators or inhalers, which widen breathing passages to help stop asthma attacks.
The new findings add to the growing unease about relying on bronchodilators as standard treatment.
For people who have mild or infrequent attacks, inhalers containing bronchodilators (such as Proventil, Ventolin, Alupent, and Metaprel) are widely prescribed and have proved in most cases to be very useful.