bronchodilator

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bronchodilator

[¦bräŋ·kō′dī‚lād·ər]
(medicine)
An instrument used to increase the caliber of the pulmonary air passages.
(pharmacology)
Any agent that causes a widening of the air passages in bronchi and bronchioles.
References in periodicals archive ?
YUPELRI is a once-daily, nebulized bronchodilator for the treatment of patients with COPD and is compatible with any standard jet nebulizer.
LABA/LAMA combination therapy seems to be superior to LABA/ICS combination therapy and should be used when long-acting bronchodilator monotherapy fails to control symptoms or reduce exacerbations.
Adrenergic bronchodilators can increase blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as decrease serum potassium levels.
Of the 232 children, 120 (51.7%) received bronchodilators and 112 (48.3%) did not.
After 3 weeks of treatment with inhaled steroids, further testing confirmed this finding, and additionally demonstrated air trapping and a lack of bronchodilator response.
Although national guidelines recommend long-acting bronchodilators for COPD that is moderate or worse, there have been few data to guide clinicians in determining which one to use.
In addition to quitting smoking, bronchodilator medications may be used to reduce the amount of air trapping, and this may be helpful in preventing the decline in heart function.
Generally, for patients with mild (intermittent) symptoms and with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV.) of 80% of predicted or greater, short acting bronchodilators can be used either intermittently or on a regular basis for symptomatic relief of dyspnea.
The children with only prenatal exposure had 45% more bronchodilator use and sleep problems.
In patients with persistent symptoms it is preferable to use long-acting bronchodilators. (1,2,5) Long-acting [beta.sub.2]-agonists (LABAs) improve symptoms, increase exercise endurance and improve quality of life.
The increased risk from the steroids was most pronounced in patients taking the highest doses for a shorter duration (less than two years), those whose lung function was 40 percent or lower than expected and those who combined the steroid with lung medications known as bronchodilators, according to the study.
We use an individual-level, fixed-effects model to estimate the unbiased effects of adding ICS treatment on monthly medical expenses and likelihood of severe exacerbations among COPD patients who were initially under treatment with regular bronchodilators. We use parameter estimates from these two models to determine the incremental cost per severe exacerbation avoided.