Brønsted acid

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Related to Bronsted acid: Arrhenius acid

Brønsted acid

[′brən·steth or ′bren‚sted ′as·əd]
(chemistry)
A chemical species which can act as a source of protons. Also known as proton acid; protonic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The increase in sorption activity with respect to Congo red is caused by both the increase in the number of Bronsted acid sites (especially for Sap7) and, possibly, by the photocatalytic activity of molybdenum disulphide in Sap7-Mo[S.sub.2].
This is because using 0.5 M (NH4)2SO4 is insufficient to provide necessary SO4 2-to form superacid; while using the high concentration (1.5 M), NH3 the decomposition product of NH4 is nucleophile inhibiting the formation of Bronsted acid sites.
Chao et al., "Direct catalytic conversion of carbohydrates to methyl levulinate: synergy of solid Bronsted acid and Lewis acid," Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, vol.
Xia, "Enantioselective Michael-type Friedel-Crafts reactions of indoles to enones catalyzed by a chiral camphor-based Bronsted acid," European Journal of Organic Chemistry, vol.
However, why the alkylation of toluene with alcohol should not takes place on the strong Bronsted acid sites?
It seems that [H.sub.5]P[Mo.sub.10][V.sub.2][O.sub.40] and [H.sub.5]P[W.sub.10][V.sub.2][O.sub.40] acted not only as Bronsted acid but also as Lewis acid in the acetylation reaction.
3:15 LEWIS ACID AND BRONSTED ACID AS CATALYSTS FOR ORGANIC
The catalyst is a Lewis acid and the initiator is a Bronsted acid, such as a halogenated compound.
In this work, it was noted that density and strength of Bronsted acid sites have significant effect on isomerization reaction mechanism.
For undoped Mn-Ce/Ti[O.sub.2], the desorption peaks centered at 552 and 663[degrees] C could be ascribed to the nature of Bronsted acid and Lewis acid, respectively [23].