Brood


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Related to Brood: brood over

brood

[brüd]
(botany)
Heavily infested by insects.
(zoology)
The young of animals.
To incubate eggs or cover the young for warmth.
An animal kept for breeding.

Brood

 

the young members of a family of birds or mammals (hatchlings, litters). Sometimes the term also refers to the offspring and both parents or one (in polygamous species). The number of young animals in the brood or litter varies greatly from species to species, depending upon their fertility; for example, birds can have from one to 24 hatchlings, and mammals can have from one to 20 young. Even within one species the number of young can vary; in particular, it depends upon the climatic conditions of the year and other such factors.

References in classic literature ?
Every impulse that we strive to strangle broods in the mind and poisons us.
Oh, there is poisonous stuff in any man's heart sufficient to generate a brood of serpents," said Elliston with a hollow laugh.
Nothing there is motionless - Nothing save the airs that brood Over the magic solitude.
And she rose up and drove them before her, till the bride saw them from her window, and was so pleased that she came forth and asked her if she would sell the brood.
But released from the spell of his brother-in-law's personal magnetism, Mr Blatherwick was apt to brood.
His deep, oval-shaped eyes were fixed upon the flames, but behind the superficial glaze seemed to brood an observant and whimsical spirit, which kept the brown of the eye still unusually vivid.
Happily, however, during that spring, they never, but once, got anything but empty nests, or eggs--being too impatient to leave them till the birds were hatched; that once, Tom, who had been with his uncle into the neighbouring plantation, came running in high glee into the garden, with a brood of little callow nestlings in his hands.
Not long after they had agreed upon this plan, the Eagle, being in want of provision for her young ones, swooped down while the Fox was out, seized upon one of the little cubs, and feasted herself and her brood.
On the side porch Dorothy's pet dog, Toto, was lying fast asleep in the sun, and to her surprise old Speckles was running around with a brood of twelve new chickens trailing after her.
In June the partridge (Tetrao umbellus), which is so shy a bird, led her brood past my windows, from the woods in the rear to the front of my house, clucking and calling to them like a hen, and in all her behavior proving herself the hen of the woods.
Don't brood too much," she wrote to Helen, "on the superiority of the unseen to the seen.
Also amongst men there is a beautiful brood of the warm sun, and much that is marvellous in the wicked.