Brothers Karamazov, The

Brothers Karamazov, The

family given to the pleasures of flesh. [Russ. Lit.: The Brothers Karamazov]
See: Lust
References in periodicals archive ?
The narrator is quoting from Father Zosima's extended sermons in Book VI of Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov, the section of the novel that explores in depth the central religious themes of the work.
A sampling of other titles and authors includes The Brothers Karamazov, The color purple, Dante's Divine comedy, Paul Ricoeur's Figuring the sacred, and W.
Within the world of The Brothers Karamazov, the continuing corruption of the innocent is a simple and all but inescapable fact.
This Christianity is not doctrinaire or systematically theological; it can be called visionary, and especially in his final masterpiece, The Brothers Karamazov, the vision is anchored in the Bible (especially the Book of Job and the Gospel of John).
In Feodor Dostoyevsky's The Brothers Karamazov, the cynical brother Ivan tells a story -- which has somehow made its way into philosophical textbooks as the beginning of existentialism -- of the Grand Inquisitor who, when Christ returns to 16th century Seville, arrests him.
The bibliography, which has no internal subdivision, contains only 101 titles, of which some items (for example, translations of Anna Karenina, Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, the poems of Arthur Hugh Clough) must be considered of very marginal interest or relevance to the specialist at whom monographs in the series are presumably aimed.
For Bakhtin's point, in Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics, the text she rites, is that in a "polyphonic" novel like The Brothers Karamazov, the discourse of a character - say, Ivan - is itself "deformed" by the incorporation of sideward glances at someone else's words, by imagined rejoinders from opponents, by public statement, hearsay, legal cliche, and so on.
In the first chapter of The Brothers Karamazov, the narrator digresses to tell a story:

Full browser ?