Brown vs. Board of Education

Brown vs. Board of Education

landmark Supreme Court decision barring segregation of schools (1954). [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 544]
See: Justice
References in periodicals archive ?
Four days after the Brown vs. Board of Education decision on May 17, 1954, the Fayetteville School Board voted to begin integration of the high school at the beginning of the next fall semester.
The equal protection guarantee of the 14th Amendment also has had broad impact in outlawing racial discrimination beginning in 1954 with Brown vs. Board of Education. Soon, all forms of racial discrimination against blacks in the South became unconstitutional.
The 12-year-olds certainly didn't see themselves as civil rights pioneers, even in a country that was barely a year removed from the epic "Brown vs. Board of Education" decision from the Supreme Court, a country that would be rocked less than three weeks later by the brutal murder of black teenager Emmett Till for supposedly whistling at a white woman in Mississippi.
Legal arguments in civil rights cases, including Brown vs. Board of Education (1954), that led to school desegregation, noted that segregation harmed U.S.
For instance, after one section entitled "Brown vs. Board of Education," we find Mildred attending Union High School, a great change from her one-room schoolroom.
Goldwater, on the other hand, opposed the Supreme Court's 1954 decision to integrate schools in Brown vs. Board of Education and the 1964 Civil Rights act.
It also helped pave the way for the Brown vs. Board of Education ruling.
It was smashed as part of white resistance to Brown vs. Board of Education [in which the Supreme Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students were unconstitutional].
Among the respondents to Merrow's question, Eisenhower and Johnson stand out as the two presidents who are truly worthy of the title "an education president." Eisenhower's enforcement of the Brown vs. Board of Education decision led to the desegregation of the nation's public schools, and Johnson made educational opportunity and equity a central component of his War on Poverty.
10th Anniversary of Black Issues In Higher Education; 40th Anniversary of Brown vs. Board of Education decision
With the passage of Brown vs. Board of Education in 1954, all public schools were to be integrated.
Supreme Court said, 'separate but equal' is not good enough, in Brown vs. Board of Education, that was not a popular decision.