Brownfield

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Brownfield

The designation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for existing facilities or sites that are abandoned, idled, or otherwise underused real property where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination that needs to be cleaned up before the site can be used again. Examples are former dry-cleaning establishments and gas stations. The use of brownfields typically reduces land cost by using land that is less desirable. However, lower land costs must be balanced against the cost of any required remediation and possible health risks to residents. The EPA sponsors an initiative to help mitigate these health risks and return the facility or land to renewed use. Many green guidelines and standards provide points for building in brownfield areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
encourage turning brownfields into mixite after cleanup is concluded.
The Brownfield Incentive Grant is the first in a series of new programs for brownfields, and each will help land owners and developers cleanup contaminated properties and bring them back into productive use.
Internet-based GIS applications were part of the strategy in redeveloping brownfields in Emeryville, California (Dayrit et al.
Zwingle: Developers seek out brownfields because they're often in highly desirable areas with great potential, often offering access to highways, railroads, waterways, and urban centers.
More than 1,330 contaminated properties in 225 communities in the state have been the beneficiaries of the state brownfields programs in the past 10 years.
There are a number of other programs to encourage redevelopment of brownfield properties in Michigan.
EPA Brownfields program began in response to community concerns about blight, disinvestment, and environmental contamination in the 1990s.
7 million to be used to conduct site assessment and planning for eventual cleanup at one or more brownfields sites or as part of a community-wide effort;
Once considered high investment and litigation risks, developers are increasingly experiencing the benefits of investing in rehabbing brownfield sites.
As a Congresswoman from North Texas, I have seen firsthand the benefits that Brownfields redevelopment can bring to a community.
Revitalizing brownfields will make communities in Duluth safer and healthier, as well as create jobs, proponents of the Brownfield Health Indicator Tool said.
Brownfields are less heavily contaminated than sites on the EPA's (https://theconversation.