Brumaire


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Brumaire

(brümâr`), second month of the French Revolutionary calendarFrench Revolutionary calendar,
the official calendar of France, Nov. 24, 1793–Dec. 31, 1805. Its introduction was decreed by the Convention on Oct. 5, 1793, but it was computed from Sept. 22, 1792, the autumnal equinox and the day after the proclamation of the republic.
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. The coup of 18 (actually 18–19) Brumaire (Nov. 9–10, 1799), engineered chiefly by Sieyès, overthrew the DirectoryDirectory,
group of five men who held the executive power in France according to the constitution of the year III (1795) of the French Revolution. They were chosen by the new legislature, by the Council of Five Hundred and the Council of Ancients; each year one director, chosen
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 and established the ConsulateConsulate,
1799–1804, in French history, form of government established after the coup of 18 Brumaire (Nov. 9–10, 1799), which ended the Directory. Three consuls were appointed to rule France—Napoleon Bonaparte (see Napoleon I), Emmanuel Joseph Sieyès,
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 under Napoleon. It nearly failed because of Napoleon's inept conduct at the Council of Five Hundred, but the situation was saved by his brother Lucien BonaparteBonaparte
, Ital. Buonaparte , family name of Napoleon I, emperor of the French. Parentage

Napoleon's father, Carlo Buonaparte, 1746–85, a petty Corsican nobleman, was a lawyer in Ajaccio.
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.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte." Later Political Writings.
The mouse serves as a reference to Marx's well-known passage from his Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte where he talks of the subterranean processes of the proletarian revolution and history that operate beneath the surface of things and describes the revolution as "journeying through purgatory" (121) (interestingly also a religious metaphor for revolution), culminating in a hidden undermining of the appearance of stability.
His writings on the French Revolutions (The Class Struggles in France, 1848 to 1850, The 18th Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte and The Civil War in France of 1871), for example, concentrate on the revolutionary overthrow of societies structured by feudal social relations and their replacement by societies structured by capitalist class relations.
Drawing on Marx's 18th Brumaire, if the evolution of the post-1917 Russian Bolsheviks was tragedy on a Napoleonic scale, the post1970 evolution of the NDP was farce in the tradition of Napoleon III.
The New Economic Policy and the Great Reforms appear somehow closer when one has seen perestroika, Weimar Germany is easier to understand in light of Yeltsin's Russia, and the rise of Putin makes one think differently about Brumaire or the demise of France's Fourth Republic.
A few days later the Convention passed the infamous law of 3 brumaire IV (25 October 1795), an omnibus bill of political exclusion.
The children that the author refers to are the five generations of French men and women who reached maturity between Napoleon's Brumaire coup of 1799 and the outbreak of World War I in 1914.
Brumaire des Louis Bonaparte, which for decades has constituted one of the principal sources of consolation for all the heterodox tendencies of communism.
Karl Marx's biting take on European history, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, opens with the proposition that historical facts happen twice, "Once as tragedy, and again as farce." (7) CACs' return to the policy scene in 2010 may well fit the pattern.
That restriction under the law of 12 Brumaire year II (2 November 1793), introduced a contradiction in the new republican version of the family and nation.
(28) The story starts with a common place situation: Harold Brumaire, an accountant driving back home after a day at the beach, is overtaken by an overloaded passenger bus on the road leading to Port-au-Prince.