Brunswick


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Brunswick

or

Braunschweig

(broun`shvīk), city (1994 pop. 256,270), Lower Saxony, central Germany, on the Oker River. It is an industrial and commercial center; its major industry is metalworking. Other manufactures include pianos, electronic equipment, food products, and printed materials. Reputedly founded c.861 and chartered in the 12th cent., Braunschweig became (13th cent.) a prominent member of the Hanseatic League. In 1753 the residence of the dukes of Braunschweig was shifted there from Wolfenbüttel. In 1830 the duke was deposed and the city became a self-governing municipality. The city has a 12th-century Romanesque cathedral, which contains the tombs of Henry the Lion (d. 1195) and Emperor Otto IV (d. 1218); several Gothic churches; and a famous fountain representing Till Eulenspiegel, the legendary prankster. The city is the site of a technical university (the oldest in Germany) and an art museum. The philosopher and dramatist Gotthold Lessing (1729–81) is buried in Brunswick.

Brunswick

(brŭnz`wĭk), Ger. Braunschweig (broun`shfīk), former state, central Germany, surrounded by the former Prussian provinces of Saxony, Hanover, and Westphalia. The region of Braunschweig is situated on the North German plain and in the northern foothills of the Harz Mts. The land is drained by the Leine and Oker rivers. The duchy of Braunschweig emerged (13th cent.) from the remnants of the domains of Henry the Lion, the duke of Saxony, to whom Emperor Frederick I had left only the territories of Braunschweig and Lüneburg (roughly modern Braunschweig and Hanover). Because the Guelphic house divided frequently, it remained somewhat separated from the German political scene. The duchy was incorporated into the kingdom of Westphalia in 1807 and recovered by Duke Frederick William (1771–1815) in 1813. The line became extinct in 1884, and Braunschweig was ruled by regents until 1913, when Ernest Augustus of Cumberland, grandson of King George V of Hanover, was made duke. A member of the North German Confederation from 1866 and of the German Empire from 1871, Braunschweig became a republic in 1918 and then joined the Weimar Republic. In 1946 it was included (except for several small territories placed in East Germany) in the West German state of Lower Saxony. Braunschweig (the former capital), Goslar, Helmstedt, and Wolfenbüttel were the chief towns.

Brunswick.

1 City (1990 pop. 16,433), seat of Glynn co., SE Ga., on St. Simon's Sound near the Atlantic coast; laid out 1771–72, inc. 1856. It is a port of entry with numerous container docks. Its sheltered harbor is used by coastal freighters and fishing and shrimping fleets, and there is an ocean terminal for shipping radioactive waste. The gateway to offshore resort islands (see Sea IslandsSea Islands,
chain of more than 100 low islands off the Atlantic coast of S.C., Ga., and N Fla., extending from the Santee River to the St. Johns River. The ocean side of the islands is generally sandy; the side facing the mainland is marshy.
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), Brunswick has a large seafood-processing industry and manufactures pulp and paper. 2 Town (1990 pop. 20,906), Cumberland co., S Maine, on the Androscoggin River and Casco Bay, in a resort area; settled as a trading post in 1628, inc. 1738. It is a growing commercial center for S Maine; products include shoes and clothing. Bowdoin College (1794) and a U.S. naval air station are in Brunswick. Nathaniel HawthorneHawthorne, Nathaniel,
1804–64, American novelist and short-story writer, b. Salem, Mass., one of the great masters of American fiction. His novels and tales are penetrating explorations of moral and spiritual conflicts.
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 and Henry Wadsworth LongfellowLongfellow, Henry Wadsworth,
1807–82, American poet, b. Portland, Maine, grad. Bowdoin College, 1825. He wrote some of the most popular poems in American literature, in which he created a new body of romantic American legends.
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 were students at Bowdoin College during the 1820s. Longfellow later taught there; a house dating from 1808 was once his home. Hawthorne's first novel, Fanshawe (1828) was printed in the town. In 1851, Harriet Beecher StoweStowe, Harriet Beecher,
1811–96, American novelist and humanitarian, b. Litchfield, Conn. With her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, she stirred the conscience of Americans concerning slavery and thereby influenced the course of American history.
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 wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin there; her house is a national landmark. After the Civil War, textiles became Brunswick's chief industry, but the mill closed in 1955. 3 City (1990 pop. 28,230), Medina co., N Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland; settled 1815 as part of the Connecticut Western Reserve, inc. 1960. A small farm community for many years, its population burgeoned after World War II. It has light industrial plants.
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Brunswick

1. a former duchy (1635--1918) and state (1918--46) of central Germany, now part of the state of Lower Saxony; formerly (1949--90) part of West Germany
2. a city in central Germany: formerly capital of the duchy and state of Brunswick. Pop.: 245 076 (2003 est.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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The Standards for Nursing Education in New Brunswick informs and supports the development and maintenance of high quality nursing education in the interest of public safety.