Brythonic


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Related to Brythonic: Goidelic

Brythonic

(brĭthŏn`ĭk), group of languages belonging to the Celtic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. See Celtic languagesCeltic languages,
subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. At one time, during the Hellenistic period, Celtic speech extended all the way from Britain and the Iberian Peninsula in the west across Europe to Asia Minor in the east, where a district still known as
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Brythonic

01. the S group of Celtic languages, consisting of Welsh, Cornish, and Breton
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The legends of sunken Brythonic cities gave a starting point, of a language as a kind of psychological territory under threat.
In fact, these abandoned people were, as always, Brythonic speaking Britons and NOT English even in the slightest...
(5) The Brythonic category of Celtic languages includes not only Welsh, but Breton, Cornish, and Pictish, amongst others.
Brythonic (Welsh) resistance against the pagan English invaders.
Being a distant relation of Irish, Brythonic Welsh also lacks a proper HABEO verb.
In AD1 the only British people on the island were the Brythonic Celts and their descendants, the Welsh and the Cornish.
Breton versus Welsh and Breton are derived from one of the early languages of the British Isles, Brythonic - meaning many words are the same or similar: English Breton Welsh house ti ty water dour dwr son mab mab head penn pen dog ki ci butter amann ymenyn apple aval afal time amzer amser writing skrivan ysgrifennu white gwenn gwyn
Over the centuries each area developed its own version of Brythonic, but it is still possible for a Welsh-speaker to get at least a general understanding of what a Cornishman or a Breton is saying in their own tongue.
According to Del the company's name, Brythonium, comes from the fact Welsh is a Brythonic language.
ABOUT 600AD a Brythonic Army famously went to fight near Catterick.
Welsh is another member of the same Brythonic branch of the Celtic language family, and as Willis (1996), Willis (1998), and Willis (forthcoming) have demonstrated, it is very similar to Breton.
The Cornish retained their cultural distinctiveness, including their own Brythonic language, and they continued to hold a grudge against the Saxons.