bubble car

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bubble car

(in Britain, formerly) a small car, often having three wheels, with a transparent bubble-shaped top
References in periodicals archive ?
The Class 121 railcar ran until recently on the Cardiff Queen Street - Bay shuttle and was popularly known as "Bubble Car".
With greater personal wealth following the end of the second world war this was exploited by manufacturers such as Messerschmitt and BMW, whose bubble cars offered greater protection from the elements than motorcycles which up until then had been the most affordable means of powered personal transport.
Designer Sir Alec Issigonis was commissioned by The British Motor Corporation to devise a small car with four seats to compete with the boom in sales of German bubble cars.
Bald, and standing proudly atop the Tango topless bus, Tango man and his glamourous little helpers lead the way, escorted by five Tangolimos (orange bubble cars).
Andy says: "As you can see, he sold everything from Jaguars to bubble cars, scooters and motorcycles."
His garage must be bigger than most homes, containing as it does assorted F1 cars, American classics, bubble cars, a newly-restored Ford Mustang and assorted oddities.
But there were also popular bubble cars, which didn't occupy much space and ran economically on small engines.
He said: "There was quite a cult following for them in the 50s and it is true that a tiny amount of them cannot reverse - I have heard of funny tales about bubble cars being driven against walls and people not being able to drive them away again.
The Peel Trident - one of only a handful of bubble cars built on the Isle of Man from 1965-6 - was first registered to an owner in Middlesbrough in 1965.
We could be looking at as much as pounds 15,000, which means that the original concept of the Mini as transport to replace scooters and bubble cars, a car for the people, a car of simplicity, integrity and design audacity, will be lost forever.
"God damn these bloody awful bubble cars," Sir Leonard Lord, head of the British Motor Corporation, was reported as telling Issigonis.