Bucephalus

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Bucephalus

(byo͞osĕ`fələs), favorite horse of Alexander the Great. There are legends of his speed and the wondrous deeds that Alexander performed while riding him. He died in 326 B.C. after the battle on the Hydaspes River. The city Bucephala was founded there by Alexander in his honor.

Bucephalus

wild steed, broken by Alexander to be his mount. [Gk. Hist.: Leach, 167]
See: Horse
References in periodicals archive ?
Ptolemy agrees with Alexander's desire to find the eastern ocean but encourages a return to Macedon first, "so the men can see their homes." This brings a meditation from Alexander on the nature of home ("I have no such place") and ultimately the assertion that "We must go on, Ptolemy, until we find an end." In the scene's most telling moment, Alexander looks up to the empty sky and asks, "Where has our eagle gone?" Zeus's eagle, first spotted at the taming of Bucephalas and omnipresent at the battle of Gaugamela, has not been seen for some time and will not be seen again until after Alexander's decision to leave India.
As the battle rages, Alexander urges Bucephalas to a foolhardy charge against a mounted elephant with the exhortation, "It is only sun and shadow." This line echoes earlier dialogue in the scene of Bucephalas's taming and serves as a metaphorical restating of the film's dominant theme.
Again altering historical events, Bucephalas and Alexander are pierced by the same arrow, then fall, gravely wounded.
Alexander was indeed almost inseparable from Bucephalas until the steed's death in Pakistan at the ripe age of around thirty.