buffer


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Related to buffer: buffer solution

buffer,

solution that can keep its relative acidity or alkalinity constant, i.e., keep its pH constant, despite the addition of strong acids or strong bases. Buffer solutions are frequently solutions that contain either a weak acid and one of its salts or a weak base and one of its salts. Many acid-base reactions take place in living organisms. However, for organisms to perform certain vital functions, the body fluids associated with these functions must maintain a constant pH. For example, blood must maintain a pH of close to 7.4 in order to carry oxygen from the lungs to cells; blood is therefore a powerful buffer.

buffer

[′bəf·ər]
(chemistry)
A solution selected or prepared to minimize changes in hydrogen ion concentration which would otherwise occur as a result of a chemical reaction. Also known as buffer solution.
(computer science)
(ecology)
An animal that is introduced to serve as food for other animals to reduce the losses of more desirable animals.
(electricity)
An electric circuit or component that prevents undesirable electrical interaction between two circuits or components.
(electronics)
An isolating circuit in an electronic computer used to prevent the action of a driven circuit from affecting the corresponding driving circuit.
(engineering)
A device, apparatus, or piece of material designed to reduce mechanical shock due to impact.
(mining engineering)
Blasted material piled against or near a rock face to improve fragmentation and reduce scattering of rock from the next blast.
A movable metal plate set in place in a tunnel excavation to limit the amount of rock scattered during blasting.

buffer

1. A device, apparatus, or material which reduces mechanical shock due to impact.
2. A device located at the bottom of an elevator hoistway, designed to stop a car or counter-weight from descending beyond its normal limit of travel; motion beyond this limit is taken up by storing or by absorbing and dissipating the kinetic energy of the car or counterweight. Also see oil buffer, spring buffer.
3. Any type of barrier that limits the scattering of rock as a result

buffer

1
1. one of a pair of spring-loaded steel pads attached at both ends of railway vehicles and at the end of a railway track to reduce shock due to contact
2. Chem
a. an ionic compound, usually a salt of a weak acid or base, added to a solution to resist changes in its acidity or alkalinity and thus stabilize its pH
b. a solution containing such a compound
3. Computing a memory device for temporarily storing data
4. Electronics an isolating circuit used to minimize the reaction between a driving and a driven circuit

buffer

2
1. any device used to shine, polish, etc.; buff
2. a person who uses such a device

buffer

(1)
An area of memory used for storing messages. Typically, a buffer will have other attributes such as an input pointer (where new data will be written into the buffer), and output pointer (where the next item will be read from) and/or a count of the space used or free. Buffers are used to decouple processes so that the reader and writer may operate at different speeds or on different sized blocks of data.

There are many different algorithms for using buffers, e.g. first-in first-out (FIFO or shelf), last-in first-out (LIFO or stack), double buffering (allowing one buffer to be read while the other is being written), cyclic buffer (reading or writing past the end wraps around to the beginning).

buffer

(2)
An electronic device to provide compatibility between two signals, e.g. changing voltage levels or current capability.

buffer

A reserved segment of memory within a program that is used to hold the data being processed. Buffers are set up to hold data coming in from and going out to the network or a local file. In a streaming media application, the program uses buffers to store an advance supply of audio or video data to compensate for momentary delays.

With computers, each application can allocate and deallocate its buffers from the general memory pool. For printers and other peripherals, the buffers provide temporary storage for data in the memory of the device. See buffering, double buffering, buffer overflow, buffer flush and bucket.
References in periodicals archive ?
The COA advised the NFA to strengthen its procurement processes to maintain buffer stocks.
Saturated buffers don't take a lot of land out of production, and they are fairly inexpensive to install, at $3,000 to $4,000 to treat the drainage water from a field-sized area, roughly 30 to 80 acres.
Not too many fans remember that before Buffer came up with his call to arms, he used to cry out "Man Your Battle Stations" and "Fasten Your Seatbelts" which were both corny.
However, ASAC does not consider the buffer state of the client and the VBR content characteristics.
The head of the Slovakia central bank has said that the institution is ready to increase its capital buffers.
All militants were supposed to withdraw from the demilitarized areas by October 15th; however, the armed groups remained inside the buffer zone, prompting the Syrian Arab Army to maintain their forces at the front-lines.
The incident reportedly took place in the buffer zone in the Sopaz area.
Schoonover believes the saturated buffer system could be an effective best management practice to reduce nutrient and sediment loss into waterways and show regulators that farmers are taking a proactive approach to limit nutrient loss.
where [m.sub.a] is the mass of the ball, [m.sub.b] is the mass of the buffer device, [v.sub.a] is the velocity of the ball, [v.sub.b] is the velocity of the buffer device, and [delta] is the relative displacement of the small ball and the buffer device.
To conserve Wi-Fi energy consumption we, therefore, need to turn off the Wi-Fi radio while the communication buffer is receiving data.
The buffer system is another system within a system, another set of moving parts.