Bukovina


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Bukovina

(bo͞okəvē`nə), Rom. Bucovina, Ukr. Bukovyna, historic region of E Europe, in SW Ukraine and NE Romania. Traversed by the Carpathian Mts. and the upper Prut and Siretul rivers, it is heavily forested [Bukovina means "beechwood" in Romanian] and produces timber, textiles, grain, and livestock. Salt is produced in quantity; other mineral resources include manganese, iron, and copper. ChernivtsiChernivtsi
, Ger. Czernowitz, Romanian Cernauţi, Rus. Chernovtsy, city (1989 pop. 257,000), capital of Chernivtsi region, SW Ukraine, on the Prut River and in the Carpathian foothills.
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, in Ukraine, is the chief city. The population is largely Romanian in S Bukovina and Ukrainian in the north. Most of the region's Jews were exterminated during World War II. A part of the Roman province of Dacia, Bukovina was overrun after the 3d cent. A.D. by the Huns and other nomads. It later (10th–13th cent.) belonged to the Kievan state (see KievKiev
or Kyiv
, Ukrainian Kyyiv, Rus. Kiyev, city (1990 est. pop. 2,600,000) and municipality with the status of a region (oblast), capital of Ukraine and of Kiev region, a port on the Dnieper River.
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) and the Halych and Volhynia principalities. After the Mongols withdrew from Moldavia, Bukovina became (14th cent.) the nucleus of the Moldavian principality. The term Bukovina was first mentioned in an agreement concluded in 1412 between King Ladislaus II of Poland and Sigismund of Hungary. In 1514, Bukovina, then part of Moldavia, became tributary to the Turkish sultans. Ceded by the Ottoman Empire to Austria in 1775, it was at first a district of Galicia but in 1848 was made, as a titular duchy, a separate Austrian crownland. The region won limited autonomy from Austria, and in 1861 Chernivtsi was made the seat of a provincial diet. Bukovina became an object of irredentism when Romania achieved full independence in 1878. The country's boundaries encompassed SuceavaSuceava
, town (1990 pop. 107,988), NE Romania, in Bukovina, on the Suceava River. It is a commercial center and has industries that manufacture food products, paper, wood products, and cellulose.
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, the ancient capital of Moldavia, but Chernivtsi was incorporated into Austria. With the dissolution of the Austrian empire in 1918, the Ukrainian national council at Chernivtsi voted the incorporation of N Bukovina into the West Ukrainian Democratic Republic. The Treaty of Saint-Germain (1919) gave only the southern part of Bukovina to Romania, but the subsequent Treaty of Sèvres awarded Romania the entire region. In a treaty of June, 1940, Romania ceded the northern part of Bukovina (c.2,140 sq mi/5,540 sq km) to the USSR, which incorporated it into the Ukrainian SSR. Although Romanian troops reoccupied N Bukovina during World War II, the Romanian peace treaty of 1947 confirmed Soviet possession of the area. N Bukovina now forms part of the Chernivtsi oblast in Ukraine. The remainder of the area (c.1,890 sq mi/4,895 sq km) forms one of the historical provinces of Romania and is part of the administrative region of Suceava.

Bukovina

, Bucovina
a region of E central Europe, part of the NE Carpathians: the north was seized by the Soviet Union (1940) and later became part of Ukraine; the south remained Romanian
References in periodicals archive ?
As a substitute for Northern Transylvania, in April 1941 Hitler returned Bessarabia and northern Bukovina to Romania and persuaded Antonescu to take control of the Transnistria territory between the Dniester and Southern Bug rivers which included port of Odessa, the largest city in Ukraine.
Archive of the Mitropolitan Church of Moldavia and Bukovina, Fond "Chancellery", Files no.
They also share a common history, since in 1918, at the end of World War I, Bessarabia, part of the Principality of Moldovia, united with Transylvania, Bukovina, and the Romanian Old Kingdom.
In that context, between November 15 and 28, 1918, Bukovina -- a part of Moldavia occupied by the Habsburgs in 1775, by the decision of the General Congress, become part of Romania.
Bukovina blind mole rat Spalax graecus revisited: Phylogenetics, morphology, taxonomy, habitat associations and conservation.
Problems of social care for children and youth in Bukovina social, political and educational publications (the end of the 19th to the Thirties of the 20th century), Austrian Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences.
Shtetl Finder: Jewish communities in the 19th and early 20th centuries in the pale of settlement of Russia and Poland, and in Lithuania, Latvia, Galicia, and Bukovina, with names of residents, Bowie, Maryland, Heritage Books.
Gregor von Rezzori, the only son of a loveless marriage, entered the world at an unpropitious time1914and in an inauspicious placethe city formerly known as Czernowitz, capital of the region known as Bukovina, in the final days of the Hapsburg empire.
Dressed in Bukovina Szekler folk costumes, Janos Varga and his wife, Monika Vargane David leave a voting booth in a polling station in Kakasd, 100 miles south of Budapest, yesterday Tamas Soki
My father, youngest of the seven, chose instead to buy land in a mountainside town in Bukovina, and, with his great legal mind, settled disputes between shepherds.
He recalled years later that, to avoid being drafted, he had traveled by train from Bukovina to Bucharest seeking a visa to the United States.