bulk cargo

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Related to Bulk freight: Break Bulk Cargo

bulk cargo

[¦bəlk ′kär‚gō]
(industrial engineering)
Cargo which is loaded into a ship's hold without being boxed, bagged, or hand stowed, or is transported in large tank spaces.
References in periodicals archive ?
With that capacity out of service it will add upward pressure on dry bulk freight rates.
The materials and commodities are loaded and unloaded on sidings with the linked network of railway track and roads which carry bulk freight such as ores, minerals, iron and steel, cement, mineral oils, food grains and fertilisers, containerised cargo, etc.
Busan, South Korea - Bulk freight rates are set to remain under pressure, as cooling commodity demand coincides with a bigger vessel fleet, increasing the pressure for consolidation in the sector, industry analysts said.
Open-deck flatbed trailers are perfect for moving machinery and can be loaded with bulk freight from virtually any angle.
Besides grain, other cargoes of coal, potash, dry bulk and general bulk freight have exceeded those posted in 2014.
After years of development, CKS owns 20 PRD inland barge terminals and operates more than 35 container barge routes, as well as 18 bulk freight routes with 17 passenger destinations and with 18 passenger routes.
The cargoes delivered by Everts crews can roughly be distributed into a pie with six pieces: bypass mail, regular mail, small parcels, bulk freight, oversize freight, and hazardous materials.
With the completion of the agreement, Mubadala has sold all of their shares in Emirates Ship Investment Company, to Oldendorff, and established a joint venture subsidiary, Eships Oldendorff Logistics (EOL) to pursue long term dry bulk freight contracts.
Taking the ocean shipping market, China Coastal Bulk Freight Index averaged at 1,134.5 points in September, up 12.4% month on month.
This slowdown in growth is attributable to decelerating economic activity in China, which over the next several years will result in weakening real demand for Chilean copper exports and reduced investment into the country's mining sector, which have the effect of depressing road, rail and maritime dry bulk freight volumes.
Many of the world's leading companies are now stepping up their use of inland water transport as it can offer the least cost, least emission mode for bulk freight and container traffic.
The global dry bulk freight market is expected to stay weak throughout 2012 and into 2013 due to an oversupply of ships, a senior executive of major ship brokerage Braemar Seascope has said, according to Reuters.