bunching

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bunching

[′bən·chiŋ]
(electronics)
The flow of electrons from cathode to anode of a velocity-modulated tube as a succession of electron groups rather than as a continuous stream.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Secretariat staff "started from scratch," as Bunche himself suggested, unaware of what peacekeeping would involve, improvising as they went along, and making mistakes.
His triumphs -- all the more striking given the era's stagnancy in racial equality at home -- earned Bunche the 1949 Nobel Peace Prize.
In this book, A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership, completed in 1940 by Bunche and submitted to Gunnar Myrdal of An American Dilemma fame, Bunche analyzes the principal black leaders at the dawn of the modern Civil Rights Movement, but, unfortunately, it was never published.
As early as 1940, while he was a young political science professor at Howard University, Ralph Bunche was compelled to write that fights for civil rights - for the right of Negroes to serve on juries, for equal salaries for Negro teachers, for the admittance of Negroes to white colleges, and even for an anti-lynch bill - do not carry an appeal to the Negro in the mass.' Instead, Bunche asserted, they meant more to "the Negro middle class who boast relatively secure positions, homes, cars, and a glittering social life, and who resent any implication of inferiority." Even today affirmative action, fair housing, integrated education and voting rights have become the means for only the most privileged or ambitious minorities to gain access to the limited "opportunities' within the system.
Without question, Bunche's achievements had saved the lives of many, many thousands of Arabs and Jews.
The authors (both of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, the Graduate Center of the City U.
He was special in other ways, 25 years later winning the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize: Ralph Bunche.
At the same age, Ralph Bunche was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
Each session included papers from all subfields of political science, and the Thursday afternoon session featured posters prepared by the 1999 class of Ralph Bunche Summer Institute scholars.
Bunche. Although King reportedly rejected the manner in which Marxist theory had been applied in Leninist regimes, he admitted to having found inspiration in the writings of Marx in late 1949.
Speaking at the Ralph Bunche library in November about his latest book "American Ambassadors: The Past, Present and Future of America's Diplomats," former FSO and two-time Ambassador Dennis Jett delved into the unique ways ambassadors are selected, saying approximately 30 percent of appointments were the result of political or economic influence on the White House.