Bunchuk

Bunchuk

 

(Turkic). (1) A staff (up to 2.5 m) with a ball or point on the upper end, horsehair braids, and two silver tassels. The bunchuk was adopted by Poland from Turkey, where it was a symbol of the pasha’s authority and title (under the name tuğ kugat). It was Cossack army regalia and a symbol of the ataman’s or hetman’s authority in the Ukraine and Poland. In 1576 it was presented for the first time by the Polish king to the Zaporozh’e host, along with a mace and banner. In the 18th century it was conferred by the government along with other regalia.

(2) An ornament or noise instrument in large military orchestras.

References in periodicals archive ?
With a bit of spare time to kill after a horseriding adventure in Mongolia, Jamie Bunchuk and his companion Matt Traver decided to packraft down the River.
48) One of this essay's anonymous reviewers rightly points out that Mazepa's bunchuk, his staff, was a symbol of power, not weakness.
In June 1929, Yascha Bunchuk (1896-1944), who had been solo cellist at the Capitol and then at the Roxy, became principal conductor at the Capitol.
The Capitol Grand Orchestra, Yasha Bunchuk conducting, presents an overture, "The Glory of Russia," which is not only a stupendous 12-minute production compiled by Yasha Bunchuk and arranged by Leo Zeitlin but which offers an extraordinary and unique feature.
Bunchuk is exhibiting artistry and distinction in overture selection that is consistently raising his rating to one of the finest pit maestros on the Street.
Bunchuk from ancient Hebrew melodies and folk-songs and symphonically arranged by Leo Zeitlin, of the Capitol's music staff.
The size of the ensemble and the combination of instruments suggest that it was destined for radio broadcast, and the cello solo suggests that Zeitlin was writing it for Bunchuk.
And audiences may have been attracted by the Capitol's newspaper advertisement, which mentioned the overture by name: "As usual--the talk of New York--Yasha Bunchuk conducting the Capitol Grand Orchestra in 'Palestina,' first American rendition of this overture.
Both he and Bunchuk knew the orchestral repertory from their playing experience, but Bunchuk did not have the training in composition and orchestration that would have informed Zeitlin's suggestions.
In any case, his star was rising once Bunchuk returned to the Capitol.
Bunchuk had arrived at the conservatory in 1910 and was a protege of Glazunov's; [75] Zeitlin finished the conservatory in 1911 after studying with Glazunov but lived in St.
His hesitation is set against the fanatical conviction of such Communists as Ivan Bunchuk, who is killed by Cossacks siding with the Whites.