Bunchuk

Bunchuk

 

(Turkic). (1) A staff (up to 2.5 m) with a ball or point on the upper end, horsehair braids, and two silver tassels. The bunchuk was adopted by Poland from Turkey, where it was a symbol of the pasha’s authority and title (under the name tuğ kugat). It was Cossack army regalia and a symbol of the ataman’s or hetman’s authority in the Ukraine and Poland. In 1576 it was presented for the first time by the Polish king to the Zaporozh’e host, along with a mace and banner. In the 18th century it was conferred by the government along with other regalia.

(2) An ornament or noise instrument in large military orchestras.

References in periodicals archive ?
Then, as dictated by both the Cossack election's ritual and the occasion, Yuri Khmelnytskyi emerged from his house and came to the council, and expressed gratitude in the name of his late father for the Cossacks selecting him in his father's stead; then, he laid down the insignia (the ceremonial mace or bulava and banner or bunchuk), bowed before the gathering, and returned to the house.
With a bit of spare time to kill after a horseriding adventure in Mongolia, Jamie Bunchuk and his companion Matt Traver decided to packraft down the River.
(48) One of this essay's anonymous reviewers rightly points out that Mazepa's bunchuk, his staff, was a symbol of power, not weakness.
In June 1929, Yascha Bunchuk (1896-1944), who had been solo cellist at the Capitol and then at the Roxy, became principal conductor at the Capitol.
The Capitol Grand Orchestra, Yasha Bunchuk conducting, presents an overture, "The Glory of Russia," which is not only a stupendous 12-minute production compiled by Yasha Bunchuk and arranged by Leo Zeitlin but which offers an extraordinary and unique feature.
But a review in the New York World was highly complimentary: "Yasha Bunchuk's compilation of 'Glories of Russia' was by far the best of the offerings in Major Bowes's Family concert last Sunday night.
[T]he most impressive part of this week's bill at the Capitol is the big orchestra's rendition of Yasha Bunchuk's and Leo Zeitlin's symphonic arrangement of a great composer's greatest efforts.
Yascha Bunchuk, who continues to be Broadway's "Man of the Hour," conducted the famous Capitol Grand Orchestra in an exotically descriptive overture "Palestina," compiled by Mr.
Leo Zeitlin, staff composer, has arranged the orchestral score." [62] Variety's review made no mention of Zeitlin and was less enthusiastic: "Yasha Bunchuk's musical feature this week is called 'Palestina.' Once more Yasha overworks the traps [drum set] and the brass to the delight of Capitol payees." [63]
Yom Kippur was with us last week, and the air teemed quite as much with the "Kol Nidrei" as it does at Christmas with the "Adeste Fideles" and at Easter with the "Regina Coeli Laudate." Of course, there are "Kol Nidreis" and "Kol Nidreis"--for instance, Yasha Bunchuk's cello version was magnificent and Roxy's chorus did the same liturgical chant superbly, but on some of the other stations the versions resembled more closely the sobbings of a dying cat than anything I can imagine.
The size of the ensemble and the combination of instruments suggest that it was destined for radio broadcast, and the cello solo suggests that Zeitlin was writing it for Bunchuk.)
His hesitation is set against the fanatical conviction of such Communists as Ivan Bunchuk, who is killed by Cossacks siding with the Whites.