Bunsen burner


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Bunsen burner,

gas burner, commonly used in scientific laboratories, consisting essentially of a hollow tube which is fitted vertically around the flame and which has an opening at the base to admit air. A smokeless, nonluminous flame of high temperature is produced. The underlying principle of the Bunsen burner is basic to common gas stoves and lamps.

Bunsen burner

[′bən·sən ′bər·nər]
(engineering)
A type of gas burner with an adjustable air supply.

Bunsen burner

a gas burner, widely used in scientific laboratories, consisting of a metal tube with an adjustable air valve at the base
References in periodicals archive ?
This is because the oxygen in the atmospheric air was mostly pushed out of the can, and therefore, the fuel mix inside the can was lacking oxygen for complete methane combustion to occur, like the yellow flame on a Bunsen burner. As the methane moves out of the top of the can, it is replaced by oxygen containing atmospheric air that enters through the bottom hole.
"You could have students going straight into second-year college science courses without ever having used a Bunsen burner."
Q MY chemistry teacher claims the Bunsen burner was invented by a man named Bunsen but I remember seeing something on TV saying someone else invented it.
But giving her an unexpected bang trim next time you're working the Bunsen burner would a) get you suspended and b) completely blow your chances of getting The Guy.
WHEN Captain Hook, our science teacher with the unfortunate nose, said today's lesson would be about currents, I showed a spark of enthusiasm that could have lit a Bunsen burner. I obviously misheard.
Yet it gives the still wannabe Scientist inside of me a glow like that of a Bunsen burner that books such as these might just open the door for the next generation or explorers of information and seekers of answers to step through.
"Elementary kids don't have the ability to manipulate a Bunsen burner and a test tube, but that doesn't mean they don't like to see it," Kordek says.
You can't tell if gas is running to the unlit Bunsen burner sitting on the table.
As a birthday present to the much-loved singer, his fans are recording and helping to market his forthcoming single Bunsen Burner, which is being released on September 30.
This glorified relative of a Bunsen burner, however, ranks second only to Sextans in faintness in Michael E.
In 1860, Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff demonstrated how they could identify useful elements such as iron, copper and lead, or sodium and potassium, in potential ores, by the colors that powdered specimens sprinkled into a Bunsen burner flame produced.