Bunsen burner

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Bunsen burner,

gas burner, commonly used in scientific laboratories, consisting essentially of a hollow tube which is fitted vertically around the flame and which has an opening at the base to admit air. A smokeless, nonluminous flame of high temperature is produced. The underlying principle of the Bunsen burner is basic to common gas stoves and lamps.
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Bunsen burner

[′bən·sən ′bər·nər]
(engineering)
A type of gas burner with an adjustable air supply.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Bunsen burner

a gas burner, widely used in scientific laboratories, consisting of a metal tube with an adjustable air valve at the base
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1860, Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff demonstrated how they could identify useful elements such as iron, copper and lead, or sodium and potassium, in potential ores, by the colors that powdered specimens sprinkled into a Bunsen burner flame produced.
When you get the test tubes and bunsen burners out?
In 57 per cent of cases, the reason given for abandoning classes involving the use of Bunsen burners and dangerous chemicals was rowdy behaviour by pupils.
There are no men in white suits brandishing Bunsen burners - instead we get bona-fide Irish celebrities.
Bryson DeChambeau (left) turned on the bunsen burners in Dubai to scorch to his fourth victory in nine starts.
The group before Easter had an amazing five weeks in our brilliant science labs, testing lots of chemicals for reactions, getting to use the Bunsen burners and experiencing some amazing experiments with our science staff.
With Bunsen burners and test tubes at the ready, the quartet of budding scientists impressed judges at Aston University as they completed a two-hour problem-solving challenge.
Brought up to equate science with spluttering Bunsen burners, sulphur and petri dishes, I am amazed at the cornucopia of delights on offer at Newcastle's Centre for Life for the Science Festival next week.
It is not about test tubes, voltmeters and Bunsen burners though.