Bunsen burner

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Bunsen burner,

gas burner, commonly used in scientific laboratories, consisting essentially of a hollow tube which is fitted vertically around the flame and which has an opening at the base to admit air. A smokeless, nonluminous flame of high temperature is produced. The underlying principle of the Bunsen burner is basic to common gas stoves and lamps.
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Bunsen burner

[′bən·sən ′bər·nər]
(engineering)
A type of gas burner with an adjustable air supply.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Bunsen burner

a gas burner, widely used in scientific laboratories, consisting of a metal tube with an adjustable air valve at the base
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
And although this liturgy appears so deeply affecting already in its present form, further knowledge of its history and gradual development is absolutely indispensable for our understanding.(25) So, like the Prussian King, Bunsen in principle considers the liturgy to be an appropriate means to achieve a union between different denominations.
In his article, Bunsen gives a survey of the history of English liturgy and draws the consequences for the contemporary situation in six theses.(27) These proposals, however, are not known to have had any immediate effect on the actual development of the debate in Germany.(28) Possibly the then crown prince and later King Frederick William IV, with whom Bunsen was on friendly terms since his visit to Rome in 1828, might have been open to Anglicanism as a result of Bunsen's ideas (though not necessarily because of this particular article).(29) This, in turn, might have had some effect upon the foundation of the Protestant see in Jerusalem in 1841 in English-Prussian co-operation.(30)
However that may be, the lack of public response did not lead Bunsen to abandon his ideas.
In practice this means that in Bunsen's liturgy the structure of the `office of confession' is exactly as indicated in the passage quoted, i.e.
Another text which Bunsen liked very much was the liturgical version of the ten commandments at the actual beginning of Holy Communion in the Book of Common Prayer.
Already in his liturgy of 1828 Bunsen laid particular stress on the liturgical commemoration of the passion of Jesus Christ.