Bunyan


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Bunyan: bunion

Bunyan

John. 1628--88, English preacher and writer, noted particularly for his allegory The Pilgrim's Progress (1678)
References in classic literature ?
But John Bunyan's father was not this kind of tinker.
"But yet," says Bunyan himself, "notwithstanding the meanness and inconsiderableness of my parents, it pleased God to put it into their hearts to put me to school, to learn me both to read and write."
Bunyan was born when the struggle between King and people was beginning to be felt, and was a great boy of fourteen when at last the armies of King and Parliament met on the battlefield of Edgehill.
Bunyan tells us that he swore and told lies and that he was the ringleader in all the wickedness of the village.
But all England was being drawn into war, and so Bunyan, when about seventeen, became a soldier.
It seems much more likely that Bunyan, so Puritan in all his ways of thought, should fight for the Puritan side.
So whether Bunyan served in the Royal army, where he might have heard oaths, or in the Parliamentarian, where he might have heard godly songs and prayers, he still went on his way as before.
This very neat and spacious edifice is erected on the site of the little wicket gate, which formerly, as all old pilgrims will recollect, stood directly across the highway, and, by its inconvenient narrowness, was a great obstruction to the traveller of liberal mind and expansive stomach The reader of John Bunyan will be glad to know that Christian's old friend Evangelist, who was accustomed to supply each pilgrim with a mystic roll, now presides at the ticket office.
In Bunyan's road-book it is mentioned as the Interpreter's House.
Bunyan's road-book, I perceived that we must now be within a few miles of the Valley of the Shadow of Death, into which doleful region, at our present speed, we should plunge much sooner than seemed at all desirable.
At the end of the valley, as John Bunyan mentions, is a cavern, where, in his days, dwelt two cruel giants, Pope and Pagan, who had strown the ground about their residence with the bones of slaughtered pilgrims.
The Christian reader, if he have had no accounts of the city later than Bunyan's time, will be surprised to hear that almost every street has its church, and that the reverend clergy are nowhere held in higher respect than at Vanity Fair.