BEA

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Related to Bureau of Economic Analysis: Bureau of Labor Statistics

BEA

Basic programming Environment for interactive-graphical Applications, from Siemens-Nixdorf.
References in periodicals archive ?
A comment in the April 1994 Survey of Current Business, the monthly journal of the Bureau of Economic Analysis, may hint at the reason behind Congress's failure to adopt green accounting: "There is an expectation that such accounts will show that U.
Estimates released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported that real gross domestic product--the output of goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States--increased at an annual rate of 4.
According to data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, consumer expenditures on furniture and household equipment, which includes categories covered by HFN, rose 2.
The economy was already contracting, as we now know from the Bureau of Economic Analysis data.
Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, at www.
The economic analysis is based upon Bureau of Labor Statistics and Bureau of Economic Analysis figures.
Commerce Department, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Census Bureau all face significant budget cuts and spending freezes in light of congressional efforts to reduce the federal budget.
The hidden weakness of the economy did more than bolster Republican political fortunes: Data collected by the National Association of Business Economists (NABE) suggests that before the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) lowered its initial 1989 GNP growth figures by an average of 1.
We're pleased to present recent research that explores how the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) personal income measure can be reconciled with the Census Bureau money income measure to produce estimates of a personal income distribution.
Major organization : Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA)
The organizers were Ana Aizcorbe of the Bureau of Economic Analysis, Colin Baker of the National Institutes of Health, and NBER Research Associates Ernst Berndt of MIT and David Cutler of Harvard University.
Civilian 21% Sources: Bureau of Business and Economic Research, The University of Montana-Missoula; Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.

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